Denial

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Jose Rivera
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Post by Jose Rivera » Thu Aug 06, 2009 8:51 pm

Asian made band saws of small size are almost identical.
No matter what brand.

If you do buy one, make sure to remove the rubber-like lubricant inside the gearbox.

The one inside mine was so thick that it was stopping the motor from turning at high speed.

I replaced it with regular gear grease after I got suggestion from chaski members.
There are no problems, only solutions.
--------------
Retired journeyman machinist and 3D CAD mechanical designer - hobbyist - grandpa

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Falcon67
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Post by Falcon67 » Thu Aug 06, 2009 9:54 pm

Jose Rivera wrote:Asian made band saws of small size are almost identical.
No matter what brand.
Yes - there is even one in the Sears tool catalog. It has a couple of extra doo-hickies on it and it's $350. Still a 4x6, looks just like my HF unit except for the cutoff switch and the black paint.

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mechanicalmagic
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Post by mechanicalmagic » Thu Aug 06, 2009 10:20 pm

I have a 4x6 HF, it cuts VERY well, in both axis. It does take a bit of fiddling to get tit right. After that, if it wanders, I replace the blade. I often have a 4 TPI skip tooth mounted, and cut on the wide side of stock. I run it wet, and like it that way.

Mine is mounted on my metal rack, with a tray top to catch the coolant. This thing has 1000# casters on all four corners, and I need a Johnson bar to lift it over the concrete (3/4") lip into the shop.

I like my 4x6. It would be better with a hydraulic control, but not so much bother that I have made one.

Pict below: Coolant pump - ebay ~$30. Coolant tank (discard from vacuum sealer). Sharp eyes may see the drill pump, on the top of the gear box, driven by the drive belt. Failed attempt, but it works good to hold the Loc-Line flexible nozzle.

Dave J.
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Every day I ask myself, "What's the most fun thing to do today."
9x48 BP clone, 12x36 lathe, TIG, MIG, Gas, 3 in 1 sheetmetal.

schwabw
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Post by schwabw » Thu Aug 06, 2009 10:38 pm

An H/V bandsaw is a great gizmo, but be warned that mine (last piece of Jet - I mean junk, I'll ever buy) looks like an undergraduate design project gone wrong. Actually, undergrad engineering students should know better than to do some of the things that appear on that saw. It is miserably (dangerously) unstable in the vertical position, and my favorite snafu is that the cutoff switch is supported at one point, allowing it to pivot out of the way to render itself useless w/o warning.

If used as a cutoff saw or a power hacksaw, it is a great machine to have. There is something to be said for clamping extruded stock into it, throwing the switch, and watching it make the cut.

I also have a Delta open 14" for wood, which works wonders on Al and some small amount of steel that I threw at it - but no promises there. The Delta was my second choice at the start. I have a Rigid table saw that is wonderful, and fully expected to get their bandsaw too. However, something didn't look quite right, and after a trip or two to each saw, I eagerly snapped up the Delta.

Bill

Harold_V
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Re: Denial

Post by Harold_V » Thu Aug 06, 2009 10:42 pm

SteveHGraham wrote:Be honest with me.

Is it time to get a band saw?
Ok, I'm being honest with you.

I like deep fried shrimp.

A shop without a saw of sorts borders on being useless. What's keeping you from buying a saw?

Harold

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mechanicalmagic
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Re: Denial

Post by mechanicalmagic » Thu Aug 06, 2009 10:59 pm

SteveHGraham wrote:Be honest with me.

Is it time to get a band saw?
With your luck, I'm not going to suggest a sharp edged tool in your future.
Harold_V wrote:I like deep fried shrimp.
A foodie friend once advised me:
"Never order Fish when you are in the desert, nor Beef at the seashore."
I suspect you are far from good fried shrimp.

Perhaps a bit of travel to different flavorful lands is in your future?
Dave J.
Every day I ask myself, "What's the most fun thing to do today."
9x48 BP clone, 12x36 lathe, TIG, MIG, Gas, 3 in 1 sheetmetal.

schwabw
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Post by schwabw » Thu Aug 06, 2009 11:06 pm

Steve,

Something else to consider. What is your budget, and is this work, play, or something in between? You are certainly welcome to keep those answers to yourself, but as all of us tool freaks keep piling on with our great new toys (like my arbor press[*]), please note that all of us have wish lists for stuff that we do not yet have because we either don't have a place to put it, can't afford it, or both.

[*] $50 at HF, just enough tool to do the job I had in mind.

You are probably discovering fist hand why we say that the machine itself is half the cost, the rest being tooling, at least for a mill. My lathe came pretty much ready to use. I already had measuring equipment, but otherwise I had to buy some hydraulic fluid and some toolbits; the rest was more or less in the crate. I _think_ the reason is that there are so many sizes and mountings for chucks that they are often sold as part of the machine; if they were not sold with the lathe, the same rule of thumb would apply.

Bill

Harold_V
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Re: Denial

Post by Harold_V » Fri Aug 07, 2009 12:27 am

mechanicalmagic wrote:"Never order Fish when you are in the desert, nor Beef at the seashore."
I suspect you are far from good fried shrimp.
Surprisingly, we have a humble little eatery here in Onalaska that serves a great steak and shrimp dinner on Fridays, for a paltry $9.95. I've eaten my share of shrimp, and can honestly say they are quite good. I rate them amongst the best I've eaten, anywhere!

That aside, we're only about 75 miles from the coast.

Harold

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BadDog
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Post by BadDog » Fri Aug 07, 2009 12:55 am

schwabw wrote:It is miserably (dangerously) unstable in the vertical position
My Wellsaw is much the same. Someone had their head up their back side on that one. I thought "Wellsaw", it's got to be a good saw! Heh... It actually is a pretty decent saw in horizontal mode, but I had to make some "kickers" to keep it from overbalancing in the up position. Too bad I didn't realize it was a problem till I bent the motor shaft and busted a pulley...

Over all, I'm (now) well satisfied with it for the money invested. Darn thing does cut very nice and square consistently. But it's a steel fab, not nice cast iron frame like it's big brothers. Sprung the frame when it fell, but I sprung it back. Casting would likely have cracked. Modified a few adjustments (on the mill) to allow for proper alignments, and all is well. Hydro bleed down-feed is a slosh-pot and needs some upgrades. Not sure whether to "stiffen it up" and add a slide weight like it's big brother uses to control rate, or add an o-ring piston and needle valve. Also still need to find a suitable cast iron table (perhaps a scrapped chicom bench drill press table) to make the missing vertical mode table. I wouldn't spend a lot of money on the small Wellsaw, just doesn't live up to the name. But it's still head and shoulders above any of the sub $2k imports...

My HF 4x6 on the other hand, needed a complete support frame/table built to replace the rickety sheet "legs" (if you can call it that). Also needed an upgraded motor, and minor upgrades for the worm drive, so not a "out of the box solution" either.

I include all this mostly for Steve. Just an FYI, but sometimes getting a good tool takes some work...
Russ
Master Floor Sweeper

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SteveHGraham
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Post by SteveHGraham » Fri Aug 07, 2009 9:04 am

"A shop without a saw of sorts borders on being useless. What's keeping you from buying a saw?"

Nothing at all. I just thought people would get a laugh out of the photo, since I bought all that metal before getting a saw.

I originally intended to cut it with my dry saw, but I learned that each cut would take over an hour. I would guess that the aluminum (the two longer pieces) would work with the dry saw, but I'd have to sit there squirting it with WD40 to keep the aluminum from welding to the blade.

Guess I have all the steel and aluminum I'll be needing for a while.
Every hard-fried egg began life sunny-side up.

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Falcon67
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Post by Falcon67 » Fri Aug 07, 2009 10:29 am

Stock cart - with saw on top. Now THERES a pregnant idea!

kvom
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Post by kvom » Fri Aug 07, 2009 10:39 am

Since Steve posted he does have space for a cart to carry a rotab, I wonder where the saw will live. :?: A power hacksaw might be a good solution, and building one would be a decent project. I've seen a few plans on the web.

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