neat little project

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bob whitmoyer
Posts: 8
Joined: Sun May 11, 2008 8:52 pm
Location: wooster,Ohio

neat little project

Post by bob whitmoyer » Sat Oct 10, 2009 8:15 pm

Hi Folks
Little shop project that I made several times for those folk whom
have everything. It preserves an old tool, gives it a useful new life
and looks good to boot. Pic explains pretty much all. Drill and tap
for small bolt on each end. Shim fixed jaw so the other can move if
need be. make a nice mount board to suit. Raw materials from
garage sales and flea markets. Use as a third hand, small vice etc.
Enjoy
Bob Whitmoyer
Attachments
wrench proj.jpg

gmann109
Posts: 399
Joined: Tue Jun 20, 2006 8:39 pm

Post by gmann109 » Sat Oct 10, 2009 9:40 pm

That's nice. I'm still using some "monkey wrenches" just like that. I got them fron my Grandfather. I bead-blasted them and gave them a nice coat of paint. They are in a tool box, waiting for the next time I need one.

I have started collecting old wrenches. I got ten of them a while back at a second hand store for $10. Some are welding cylinder wrenches, a few "S" shaped open end wrenches and some with plain handles and a large round ring wrench on one end. I soaked them in a dilute phosphoric acid bath to loosen up the rust and then blasted them. I then gave them another acid bath and now they are a nice uniform dark phosphate gray. They're in there with my two monkey wrenches and the vintage pipe wrenches. I have three of the pipe wrenches, all US made and all probably more than 100 years old.They are better than any of the Chinese ones that you find now.

I bought two Chinese-made "Forney" files at Ace Hardware last year. I've used them about five times and they are already shot. I'm looking for some good ones now. the Chinese ones look nice but they won't last.

I wonder if there are any American-made tools anymore?

Here's a picture of a vintage 3/4" mill vise handle that I got on eBay this week. I'm going to remove the rust and polish it up for my old 6" mill vise that I use for a spare. Since I got the Kurt vise, I use the old vise on a work bench. Nothing goes to waste around my place. LOL.

The interesting thing about the mill vise handle shown is that I discovered that it's forged steel and it's incredibly hard! So I guess it's not going to break any time soon.

That's a nice display you made. You never know when you'll need a monkey wrench and if you do, it will be handy! :D

Image

spro
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Joined: Mon Feb 20, 2006 11:04 pm
Location: mid atlantic

the curious thing

Post by spro » Sat Oct 10, 2009 10:35 pm

The wrench preservation is fine. There are those among us which have an entire set hanging up somewhere and use them. The live steam folk always have plenty of these "monkeywrenches". They are still very good for a multiple of uses. Even in a modern garage they are like a hand vise. You can bend sheet metal lips and pound or set them up in a larger vice to hold around previous set jaws. The worse thing is using them backwards and many good ones have been sprung that way.
The curious thing is that when I was buying one by one and putting a set together, it woulda been nice to get a collection of all one make-like Billings or Pexto and others. The places I would go then would have diners/shops around the markets and sure enough there would be one nailed between the joists -for ambiance. Not that it was a big deal. Except it's not so much the handle, it the cast threaded stuff which takes a lot of time(if ever) to fix.

gmann109
Posts: 399
Joined: Tue Jun 20, 2006 8:39 pm

Re: the curious thing

Post by gmann109 » Sat Oct 10, 2009 11:12 pm

spro wrote:The wrench preservation is fine. There are those among us which have an entire set hanging up somewhere and use them. The live steam folk always have plenty of these "monkeywrenches". They are still very good for a multiple of uses. Even in a modern garage they are like a hand vise. You can bend sheet metal lips and pound or set them up in a larger vice to hold around previous set jaws. The worse thing is using them backwards and many good ones have been sprung that way.
The curious thing is that when I was buying one by one and putting a set together, it woulda been nice to get a collection of all one make-like Billings or Pexto and others. The places I would go then would have diners/shops around the markets and sure enough there would be one nailed between the joists -for ambiance. Not that it was a big deal. Except it's not so much the handle, it the cast threaded stuff which takes a lot of time(if ever) to fix.

I've got a nice Pexto draw knife that I found in a flea market. I used to carve guitar necks with it. I also have a Greenlee drawknife and a Stanley brand, USA-made Spoke Shave. Years ago I found several Stanley brand cabinet scraper plates. They are a square sheet of metal, about 4 X 5" usually about 1/8" or less thick that give a nice finish to wood without leaving any sanding marks. You can draw an edge on them with a sharpening rod so that they cut like a razor blade.

It's too bad that such tools are not very common any more.

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Frank Ford
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Location: Palo Alto, CA
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Post by Frank Ford » Sun Oct 11, 2009 9:30 am

It's too bad that such tools are not very common any more.
But, it's not surprising considering the lack of jobs for users of the tools, lack of manual and shop training in school, and general lack of craft these days. . .
Cheers,

Frank Ford

quasi
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Joined: Sat Dec 13, 2008 11:31 pm
Location: Calgary, Alberta, Kanada

Post by quasi » Sun Oct 11, 2009 4:35 pm

Lee Valley sells new Cabinet Scrapers.

gmann109
Posts: 399
Joined: Tue Jun 20, 2006 8:39 pm

Post by gmann109 » Sun Oct 11, 2009 4:53 pm

quasi wrote:Lee Valley sells new Cabinet Scrapers.
I'll take a look. they are great for large areas of wood. I dont like sandpaper since it often can leave marks. Cabinet scrapers make the wood shine nicely and used properly leave no marks.
Last edited by gmann109 on Mon Oct 12, 2009 7:58 am, edited 1 time in total.

spro
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Joined: Mon Feb 20, 2006 11:04 pm
Location: mid atlantic

scraper

Post by spro » Sun Oct 11, 2009 11:08 pm

Gmann109 . Fwiw there were some pretty neat tools to guide those scraping blades. The Stanley series alone had at least 5 distinct types. These would be for the 2 7/8 x ~ 4 1/2" blades. Most were set up like a spokeshave with a long continuous handle across the top. . The #12 , 12 1/2 allowed you to set the blade at any angle and it had a rosewood sole. #s 80 and 81 are the simplest and most common they fix the blade at one angle. # 83 was guided by an adj roller for angle and had no sole.
Some were more strange and pushed the blade as they were built like a wide hand plane with the rosewood knob & handle. They had variable angle adj. Most of those were/ are too collectible expensive to contemplate ( #85, 87 )

gmann109
Posts: 399
Joined: Tue Jun 20, 2006 8:39 pm

Re: scraper

Post by gmann109 » Mon Oct 12, 2009 8:06 am

spro wrote:Gmann109 . Fwiw there were some pretty neat tools to guide those scraping blades. The Stanley series alone had at least 5 distinct types. These would be for the 2 7/8 x ~ 4 1/2" blades. Most were set up like a spokeshave with a long continuous handle across the top. . The #12 , 12 1/2 allowed you to set the blade at any angle and it had a rosewood sole. #s 80 and 81 are the simplest and most common they fix the blade at one angle. # 83 was guided by an adj roller for angle and had no sole.
Some were more strange and pushed the blade as they were built like a wide hand plane with the rosewood knob & handle. They had variable angle adj. Most of those were/ are too collectible expensive to contemplate ( #85, 87 )
Yes, Stanley was an amazing company at one time. They had a great variety of tools as you describe. I have one spokeshave as I mentioned. I've always used the scrapers by hand but I was aware that they had holders for them, from a catalog that I once saw.

Unfortunately, you just don't see those tools around anymore, not even at the ordinary swapmeet.

At one time, I had a music store with my brother. We had a lot of power tools in the back of the store for repairs. I still have them all but they're in my barn, now. I still have my 14" Delta woodworking bandsaw and a 1940's 4" X 12" Parks Power Plane that I restored in 1973.

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