DRO installation

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tailshaft56
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DRO installation

Post by tailshaft56 » Wed Nov 11, 2009 2:25 am

I picked up a 3 axis DRO @ Grizzly today. My big conundrum is installing the X axis on the front of the table without losing the powered feed limiter and the table locks. To keep the limit switch would require spacers a little over an inch and a half long. I would like to use the scale cover which will require the scale to be spaced out no more than 1/4 to 3/8 inch. If I hang things too low the table locks can't be used.
Dennis


Thermal Arc 185-TS
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Atlas Craftsman 12 by 24 Lathe
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Dave_C
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DRO

Post by Dave_C » Wed Nov 11, 2009 8:16 am

Tailshaft,

For the reasons that you mentioned most mills have the scale mounted on the back side of the table. The drawback is that it limits the amount of travel on a small mill! I have a small mill and wanted to put a DRO on it as well but I have not been able to resolve the travel loss issue or mounting the scale on the front and lossing the power feed stops. I suppose using some long spacers may be the answer if it has to go on the front.

Dave C.
I learn something new every day! Problem is I forget two.

gmann109
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Post by gmann109 » Wed Nov 11, 2009 11:40 am

The X-Axis is best installed on the rear of the table. I've not seen one on the front, although I guess some people mount them there.

An X-axis scale of the proper length (longer than actual travel) won't limit your travel at all.

david5605
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Post by david5605 » Wed Nov 11, 2009 12:58 pm

I have a rf45 clone and I mounted the x scale on the front. I also wanted to keep the limit switch and the table locks accessable.

Here was my approach. Hopefully pictures follow.

Mounted a piece of aluminum angle on the front of the table. this will be the scales main protection and also hold the rubber flap on the front (see picture).
Mounted the x scale with the aluminum angle between the scale and the table.
Mounted aluminum blocks on each end of the aluminum angle to hold limit switch bars. Fastened them through the angle to the front x dovetail slot too.
Mounted the scale head to the mill with appropriate aluminum angle.
Mounted limit switch in front of read head. On same bracket as read head.
Clamped rubber membrane to front underside of angle.
Then....Had to make an extension piece for the Y table handwheel to space it out about 1-1/2". Otherwise the new setup ran in to it if the Y was cranked out to its limit.

The bracket shown was sort of designed on the fly so it looks sort of hacked (to say the least).

I'm happy with the end result but sometimes designing as you go can be frustrating.
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tailshaft56
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Post by tailshaft56 » Thu Nov 12, 2009 12:48 am

gmann109 wrote:The X-Axis is best installed on the rear of the table. I've not seen one on the front, although I guess some people mount them there.
An X-axis scale of the proper length (longer than actual travel) won't limit your travel at all.
The limiting takes place on the Y axis as the table travels almost to the column base. You lose about an inch and a half with the supplied aluminum cover. This drops the Y travel to 6 inches.
Dennis


Thermal Arc 185-TS
Millermatic Challenger 172
Victor O/A
Atlas Craftsman 12 by 24 Lathe
Esab PCM-875
Wholesale Tool Mill-Drill

gmann109
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Post by gmann109 » Thu Nov 12, 2009 1:05 am

tailshaft56 wrote:
gmann109 wrote:The X-Axis is best installed on the rear of the table. I've not seen one on the front, although I guess some people mount them there.
An X-axis scale of the proper length (longer than actual travel) won't limit your travel at all.
The limiting takes place on the Y axis as the table travels almost to the column base. You lose about an inch and a half with the supplied aluminum cover. This drops the Y travel to 6 inches.
Yes, I see what you mean. Well, you have to make allowances for different types of machines.

Good luck!

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tailshaft56
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Post by tailshaft56 » Thu Nov 12, 2009 1:19 am

David 5605

Thanks for sharing your setup. I was thinking of spacing the scale out and reworking the limit switch so that it would be about half as thick as the stock switch. The drawback is it would likely entail using microswitches and might require a lowvoltage supply and the use of a couple of relays.

Seems like your setup is more elegant and may be the way to go.
Dennis


Thermal Arc 185-TS
Millermatic Challenger 172
Victor O/A
Atlas Craftsman 12 by 24 Lathe
Esab PCM-875
Wholesale Tool Mill-Drill

CB&Q
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Post by CB&Q » Thu Nov 12, 2009 9:40 pm

tailshaft56 wrote:David 5605

Thanks for sharing your setup. I was thinking of spacing the scale out and reworking the limit switch so that it would be about half as thick as the stock switch. The drawback is it would likely entail using microswitches and might require a lowvoltage supply and the use of a couple of relays.

Seems like your setup is more elegant and may be the way to go.
Have you any info regarding the age and origin of your Craftsman/Atlas lathe? I ordered mine when I was 15, long, long ago. It is the 24" centers version, w/o quick-change gears, as money was in very short supply. The motor I chose to go with it was a Craftman ball bearing 1/2 HP. In all those years, the motor still serves well, having had new bearings installed once. I am now on my 3rd. or 4th. on-off switch. This machine has made lirterally thousands of parts during it's 50+ year life.......

CB&Q
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gmann109
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Post by gmann109 » Thu Nov 12, 2009 10:26 pm

CB&Q wrote:
tailshaft56 wrote:David 5605

Thanks for sharing your setup. I was thinking of spacing the scale out and reworking the limit switch so that it would be about half as thick as the stock switch. The drawback is it would likely entail using microswitches and might require a lowvoltage supply and the use of a couple of relays.

Seems like your setup is more elegant and may be the way to go.
Have you any info regarding the age and origin of your Craftsman/Atlas lathe? I ordered mine when I was 15, long, long ago. It is the 24" centers version, w/o quick-change gears, as money was in very short supply. The motor I chose to go with it was a Craftman ball bearing 1/2 HP. In all those years, the motor still serves well, having had new bearings installed once. I am now on my 3rd. or 4th. on-off switch. This machine has made lirterally thousands of parts during it's 50+ year life.......

CB&Q
Those Craftsman motors were excellent. I have a Craftsman Drill Press that my father bought new in 1959. It had a 1/2 hp motor that lasted 40 years until about 1999 when I had to replace it since it began to burn up. That's pretty good service. I still use the drill press nearly every day.

In the old days when they were American made, Craftsman tools were as good as or better than anything on the market.

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tailshaft56
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Post by tailshaft56 » Fri Nov 13, 2009 1:11 am

I don't know the history of mine. I was thinking of a 3 in 1 but this came along. Sort of lucked into it. I was getting an oil change and picked up a copy of the big nickel and saw the add. I guess the God of machine tools was smiling that day..as I also happened to have the money to buy it. It was a 12 X 24. Keith from Kansas called me one day about getting picking up a couple of used engravers built on an Atlas 36" lathe bed and cabinet. I now have a 12 X 36 on a cherry bed. Just need to make a longer lead screw someday.
Dennis


Thermal Arc 185-TS
Millermatic Challenger 172
Victor O/A
Atlas Craftsman 12 by 24 Lathe
Esab PCM-875
Wholesale Tool Mill-Drill

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tailshaft56
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Post by tailshaft56 » Thu Nov 26, 2009 1:32 am

The X axis is complete. The cover is two pieces of Al. angle tigged together. I still need to fabricate the bracket for the power feed limit switch. The stops are going to be blocks that clamp to the outboard piece of angle. Hopefully the linear bearings will be here by next week so I can do the z axis then all will be right with the world. ( At least the part of it I can control.)
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Dennis


Thermal Arc 185-TS
Millermatic Challenger 172
Victor O/A
Atlas Craftsman 12 by 24 Lathe
Esab PCM-875
Wholesale Tool Mill-Drill

gr8life
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Post by gr8life » Thu Nov 26, 2009 11:11 pm

Tailshaft If your stop switch is in a box w/ 2 spring buttons sticking out you have your micro switches. Just open the box & look. If they are there you can build a new box & put the switches in it, then you can have your x axis in front along w/ your stops. Let me know if you need pix.
ed

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