Pictures of my Lathe/mill adjustable feet

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Davo J
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Location: Australia

Pictures of my Lathe/mill adjustable feet

Post by Davo J » Thu Apr 01, 2010 9:05 am

Hi guys,
I just finished making these adjustable feet so I thought I would post them up.

There made from materials I had on hand. I started out with only making 6 for the lathe because I have just finished moving it, and can't bolt it down were it is. Then I decided to make the 4 for the mill and 4 for the shaper while I had the lathe set up to do them, and saves doing them latter.

They are made from 50mm mild steel I had, cut to around 25mm in length on the band saw, with a 14mm hole drilled in the centre on the lathe then shaped up to what I thought looked good.
I cut up some old chemset thread rod that I had as well. That why 6 have a hex in the end.
The thread rod is metric 16x2mm machined down to 14mm dia on one end, 15mm long. I used the vise to press them together and then plug welded them from the bottom.

The machined recess on the sides were the black is, is only to give the look of factory machine mounts, that are made of two pieces. For a lathe your better off with solid mounts to stop movement after it's leveled.

The last picture shows the feet installed on the extension bases I made when I got the lathe, the Chinese just don't make these lathe stands high enough for us Aussies. I made the extensions out of 75x75x4mm square tube cut down the middle to make C sections.

Dave.
Attachments
Picture 002 (Medium).jpg
Picture 004 (Medium).jpg
Picture 015 (Medium).jpg
Picture 017 (Medium).jpg

Peter.
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Post by Peter. » Thu Apr 01, 2010 10:19 am

Looks like nice work!

Jose Rivera
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Post by Jose Rivera » Thu Apr 01, 2010 10:42 am

Nice !!
There are no problems, only solutions.
--------------
Retired journeyman machinist and 3D CAD mechanical designer - hobbyist - grandpa

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Richard_W
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Post by Richard_W » Thu Apr 01, 2010 11:57 am

Looks a lot better than some I have seen in stores. Good job.

Richard W.

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thedieter
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Location: Yakima, WA

Post by thedieter » Thu Apr 01, 2010 5:28 pm

Davo J:

Those are nice looking feet!

The only thing that worries me is that lathes are tippy (top heavy) and I would prefer a wider wheel base. I like the beam vertical extension...I used wood with outriggers fromt and back as wood obsorbs some vibration.

If you can use the three point suspension between the lathe and drip pan to avoid bed twist and widen the feet on the floor it will be less likely to tip.

Best regards, Jack

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Davo J
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Post by Davo J » Thu Apr 01, 2010 8:13 pm

Thanks guys, I was going for the factory look.

Jack.
Pushing with all my weight on the top of the headstock, my lathe doesn't move, though I have around 100kg in each cupboard so that might be keeping it down. I had thought about extensions but I don't seem to need them. The lathe is only going to be here for a while, then it will get moved into the new shed were it will bolted down again.

The 3 point system doesn't give you any way to adjust the twist out of a lathe.
I know to type of lathe's your talking about, but they were quality lathe's with a large mass of aged castings. Remember theses Chinese lathes have green castings when sent over ,and are bolted to a soft wood pallet for there journey , they need training to get them strait and keep them strait.
Have you put a level on each end of yours ?

Dave

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thedieter
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Post by thedieter » Fri Apr 02, 2010 4:18 pm

Davo:

Both ends of my lathe check as level with a carpenter's level which is the best that I have...I would have to turn a test bar to make sure but I have not seen anything that indicates that it turns a taper. (actually I should say that both ends check unlevel by the same amount) I am not a "lathe must be level" type.

Pushing by hand is nothing compared to what an earthquake can do. The extra weight in the base will help but a wider wheelbase is better.

Best regards, Jack

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Davo J
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Post by Davo J » Sat Apr 03, 2010 9:59 pm

Hi Jack,
I don't think I will ever see another earth quake, anyway I would be more worried about the stuff falling down off the shelves and from above me LOL.

It is surprising how much a small bit of twist will turn a taper. I made a spindle for my Grandfathers home made lathe, and found when getting close to the measurements that one bearing journal was bigger than the other 100mm apart.
I never had a problem before when it was bolted down and shimmed so I thought the head stock had moved.
The first plan of attack was to level it up then loosen the head stock after some trial cutting. After leveling it up all was good again with no measurable taper at 200mm out on a 50mm steel bar, which surprised me to say the least.
If you want prcisision out of machinery you need to set them up right. I think a level is worth the $50 investment to do that job, and gives you another excuse to buy a tool. :D
Dave

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thedieter
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Post by thedieter » Sat Apr 03, 2010 11:32 pm

Davo:

That would be a good one for the "Best one liners" on the Home Shop Machinist Forum..."I don't think I will ever see another earth quake" :P

If I see any signs that one of my lathes isn't turning true, I will work on it. I doubt if any of my lathe stands are stiff enough to twist the ways. I want to send for some other tools...I need new grinding wheels along with some mill goodies and metals.

Best regards, Jack

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Davo J
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Post by Davo J » Sun Apr 04, 2010 12:46 am

Jack,
Looks like Ill go down in history with the forums "Best one liner" 8)
We don't live in earth quake city like you guys, were you have to prepare for the next one, then the next then the........ :(
I have more chance of seeing a blue moon over here than another earth quake in my life time.

:idea: It doesn't matter what the lathe stand is made of, it's weight is enough to twist it.
Dave

tackit
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Post by tackit » Sun Apr 04, 2010 8:14 am

Very nice job on the adjustable feet Davo.
www.chaski.com

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thedieter
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Post by thedieter » Sun Apr 04, 2010 3:46 pm

Davo:

Where we moved "Yakima, Washington" is not earthquake country but there are some nice volcanos within 50 miles.

In '89 when we were in Gosford, my daughter's in-laws told us that there are no earthquakes in AU, yeah, right!

Best regards, Jack

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