New Toy Arrived

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Doc Hoy
Posts: 39
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2009 4:22 pm
Location: Chesapeake, VA

New Toy Arrived

Post by Doc Hoy » Wed Dec 30, 2009 2:02 pm

Just took delivery of a Grizzly 10 x 22 lathe.

It arrived in perfect condition.

$1025.00 plus free shipping.
Tnx,

Doc

I don't think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday. ~Abraham Lincoln

Al_Messer
Posts: 2664
Joined: Sat Jan 04, 2003 7:12 pm
Location: Mid Tenn.

Post by Al_Messer » Thu Dec 31, 2009 12:59 pm

Congratulations and have loads of fun using it!
Al Messer

"One nation, under God"

Doc Hoy
Posts: 39
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2009 4:22 pm
Location: Chesapeake, VA

Thanks Al,

Post by Doc Hoy » Thu Dec 31, 2009 3:01 pm

It is a replacement for a Grizzly 4015 three in one. I am impressed with it so far.

Made a shaft for a tool post yesterday.

I am sure I will be back to ack for pointers as the weeks go by.

Tnx,
Tnx,

Doc

I don't think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday. ~Abraham Lincoln

drivadesl
Posts: 69
Joined: Fri Dec 26, 2008 5:17 pm
Location: Orange Cty, NY

Post by drivadesl » Wed Feb 10, 2010 5:45 pm

How about a picture??? What kind off projects have you planned?

User avatar
xo18thfa
Posts: 149
Joined: Tue May 17, 2005 11:59 pm
Location: Las Vegas NV

Post by xo18thfa » Thu Feb 11, 2010 7:43 pm

Congratulations. I think you are going to like it. I really wanted to get one of those, but due to space limits got the 9 x 19 instead.

How about some pictures?

Bob
Bob Sorenson, Las Vegas, Nevada

Doc Hoy
Posts: 39
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2009 4:22 pm
Location: Chesapeake, VA

Sorry guys

Post by Doc Hoy » Sun Apr 04, 2010 9:15 am

Sorry it has been so long since I have been on the forum.

To drivadesl,

Right now am just making parts for the lathe itself. I am working on a poor man's taper set-up. The concept has worked one time. Now I am trying to smooth it up. Also used it to make a nipple wrench fitting to go onto an impact wrench. (screw driver?) That did not work because the metal was too soft.

To the XO,

I was trying to decide between Harbor Freight nine inch and Grizzly nine inch. Then three things happened.

1. I broke a feed screw follower on the Grizzly Machine I had and I got absolutely great service from Grizzly.

2. Harbor Freight store could not predict when they would be getting a lathe in the store. (Two months later they still don't have one.)

3. Grizzly put their ten inch on sale.

Decision made.
Tnx,

Doc

I don't think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday. ~Abraham Lincoln

Doc Hoy
Posts: 39
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2009 4:22 pm
Location: Chesapeake, VA

Some photos

Post by Doc Hoy » Sun Apr 04, 2010 6:16 pm

Here are some photos of the lathe and mill.

I do not seem to be able to put in more than two images.
Attachments
Mill and lathe.jpg
Lathe.jpg
Tnx,

Doc

I don't think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday. ~Abraham Lincoln

Doc Hoy
Posts: 39
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2009 4:22 pm
Location: Chesapeake, VA

Photos of the taper

Post by Doc Hoy » Sun Apr 04, 2010 6:20 pm

This is a "Rube Goldberg" poor man's taper setup I put together. The micrometers are exactly three inches apart. They are adjusted to zero out when the compound is set to parallel the feed direction. I back off on one of the micrometers and tighten up on the other to match the taper over three inches. I put a chart of the various tapers as a reference which I keep near the lathe. I have cut a JT3 on it which works like a champ.
Attachments
Taper jig 2.jpg
Taper jig.jpg
Tnx,

Doc

I don't think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday. ~Abraham Lincoln

Russ Hanscom
Posts: 1556
Joined: Wed Mar 15, 2006 11:10 pm
Location: Farmington, NM

Post by Russ Hanscom » Sun Apr 04, 2010 8:33 pm

Great idea on the taper measurement.

There was a dedicated taper measuring micrometer available for a short time but it never caught on and not too many were made. I found a picture by accident - great find if you are lucky.

Doc Hoy
Posts: 39
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2009 4:22 pm
Location: Chesapeake, VA

Russ,

Post by Doc Hoy » Mon Apr 05, 2010 5:22 am

The jury is still out on this one. I used the concept to set up a cut on a JT for a drill chuck and it worked very well. Nice fit. Chuck stays in place.. No wobble.

Problem is that to make the cut I am using the unpowered compound. That means I don't get a nice finish on the cut. At least until I get better at it.

The micrometers (as I said) are three inches apart and the center of that three inches is also the center of the pivot of the compound. This makes it very easy to adjust. If I calulate that the total taper over three inches is .040, I back off the right micrometer by 20, loosen the lock nuts for the compound, carefully move the compound until the base contacts the micrometer. Then snug up the lock nuts and check the setting of the left micrometer when it is adjusted to contact the base of the compound. I then subtract the lower reading from the higher and verify that I have come up with the desired taper. Then tighten the lock nuts. Right now the jig is still on the machine, but I will store it underneath when I m not actually setting up a taper.

I finished the jig yesterday. Tried the adjustment several times and never got more than one thousands error.
Tnx,

Doc

I don't think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday. ~Abraham Lincoln

User avatar
Bill_Cook
Posts: 520
Joined: Sat Jan 04, 2003 10:28 pm
Location: Walnut Bottom, PA, USA

Re: Russ,

Post by Bill_Cook » Mon Apr 05, 2010 10:12 am

Turning a taper that holds is no small feat.
Doc Hoy wrote:Problem is that to make the cut I am using the unpowered compound. That means I don't get a nice finish on the cut. At least until I get better at it.
Turning a feed handle by the knob is OK for moving without cutting.
To get the smoothest feed however without power takes two hands. Wrap a hand around the handle with a finger (your choice) or palm caught on the knob, and start turning. before your hand runs out of twist "hand off" to the other.

On larger spoked wheels hands can wrap around the rim and against the spokes.

On the three ball handles there is no circumference to work from. Grab plenty of the handle and hand off. If done well, the handle will become hand polished.

Keep plenty of hand on the handle. Exactly how you grab, twist, and hand off depends on how your hands work. With some practice it will become second nature.

BC
BC

If there was only one way to do each machining job, the smell of sulphurized cutting oil smoke would have fewer fond memories.

Doc Hoy
Posts: 39
Joined: Wed Nov 18, 2009 4:22 pm
Location: Chesapeake, VA

Bill,

Post by Doc Hoy » Mon Apr 05, 2010 10:31 am

Thanks a lot for the info.

I think I remember a project in which a machinist installed a motor to advance the compound.

Have you seen anything like that?

Tnx,
Tnx,

Doc

I don't think much of a man who is not wiser today than he was yesterday. ~Abraham Lincoln

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