First time poster here, and new to machining!

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ken572
Posts: 2600
Joined: Sun Mar 14, 2010 8:11 pm
Location: Mesa, Arizona. 85201-1517

Re: First time poster here, and new to machining!

Post by ken572 » Sat Nov 27, 2010 11:43 am

Pat,

All of your projects you have done so far are very well done.
Your write up's and pictures are also very well done. :wink:

Ken. :)
One must remember.
The best learning experiences come
from working with the older Masters.
Ken.

Patio
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Joined: Wed Oct 06, 2010 3:14 pm
Location: Centralia Wa

Re: First time poster here, and new to machining!

Post by Patio » Tue Nov 30, 2010 1:12 am

My latest progress in the world of maching.
I ruined a perfectly nice piece of steel, but learned how to make my next part. I also like to draw in CAD a little bit, but intill recently have not been able to afford some of the better software, like Solid Works, which is a wonderful program wich can cost thousands of dollars. So in my search for free software I have discovered Google SketchUp. It is open source software and free. Great for being able to show some one what you have in mind.
Here is the drawing, I made in Google SketchUP of the adapter, for the Milling Adapter, I am going to try to make. The sin angle dimensions my not be correct. Everything else it close.
Milling adapter dim..jpg
This is a picture of the trial run to turn the angles I need.
IMG00398-20101127-2027.jpg
Now I just need to go and get another piece of cold rolled steel and start over. :)

Thats it for now.
Live for the moment!
Prepare for tomorrow!
Forgive the past!

Patio
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Joined: Wed Oct 06, 2010 3:14 pm
Location: Centralia Wa

Re: First time poster here, and new to machining!

Post by Patio » Mon Dec 06, 2010 1:50 am

Todays progress;


After a couple of attempts I finally got the milling adapter, adapter finished for the lathe.
These are the pictures of the many attempts and finished part, being as I am teaching my self through the trail and error method, with guidance and information gotten from here. :)

The top left was the first try at just getting the major diameters right. The upper right is learning to turn the proper angle and also get the depth right, although I did not get the shoulder in the right place. The bottom row left is a messup with the major diameter again, but I continued on finishing the part as a close replica of the original part, which is in the middle, and on the right is the final part correctly made.
IMG00021-20101205-2045.jpg
Progress during making of the part.
First half complete.
IMG00015-20101205-1620.jpg
Turned around in chuck, re-indicated, cut the other bevel and am now doing the last facing cut, with a tool made by Harold V.
I got the opportunity to get a crash course on tool grinding and chip breaker forms, from Harold last weekend and in the process he made this tool. Thanks Harold for your time and patience.
IMG00016-20101205-2020.jpg
As the part fits the lathe and milling attachment.
IMG00018-20101205-2032.jpg
IMG00019-20101205-2033.jpg
Milling attachment installed on lathe.
IMG00020-20101205-2035.jpg
Now I will have the ability to drill holes in small parts where they are suppose to be, and more.
Next up in the project list is to make the bar and holding bracket for the taper attachment. For that project I will need to get the Shaper into shape.
Steamin10
Not really critical, but the backer I made from a blank, was trimmed to the exact diameter of the chuck, and lightly corner broken, and smoothed withcloth and finally steel wool. You can easily see the joint and its division, but offers no resistance in catching anything.
I took the chuck off the backing plate, after scribing the outside diameter of the chuck on it, and turned it to size. I chamfered the corners, hit is with some emery cloth, and it came out nice.

Another good day.
More to come later.
Live for the moment!
Prepare for tomorrow!
Forgive the past!

JackF
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Location: Caldwell, Idaho

Re: First time poster here, and new to machining!

Post by JackF » Mon Dec 06, 2010 1:36 pm

Nice work Pat. We love the pics and for sure keep posting of your progress and triumphs.

Jack.

Patio
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Joined: Wed Oct 06, 2010 3:14 pm
Location: Centralia Wa

Re: First time poster here, and new to machining!

Post by Patio » Mon Dec 06, 2010 8:36 pm

JackF wrote:Nice work Pat. We love the pics and for sure keep posting of your progress and triumphs.

Jack.
Thanks for the feedback.
I was wondering if anyone found my, learning process interesting at all. I have read many of the other post on the board and seen some of the stuff all you guys do, it is just amazing. If one compared it to art, I am learning to draw with crayons, and some the the other guys here are doing wonderful water colors. Me I just want to be able to use pen and pencils.
I don't know if I will ever try to get to the level of the masters here, as I do not have a lifetime left to learn, or the money, (unless I win the Lottery) to afford the tooling required for some of the work. I will do the best I can with what I got on hand and enjoy every minute.

Thanks to all the supporters of this board, I couldn't learn all this with out you.
Live for the moment!
Prepare for tomorrow!
Forgive the past!

Steffin T
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Re: First time poster here, and new to machining!

Post by Steffin T » Mon Dec 06, 2010 8:55 pm

Patio, if you are machining with "crayons"... then I am still stuck in the corner "finger-painting". Very nice, I enjoy seeing pics of the 'processes of operation', they help with the "finger-painting". I agree, many here have achieved a level which is amazing... and are willing to share that experience/information... which is even more amazing.

Patio
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Location: Centralia Wa

Re: First time poster here, and new to machining!

Post by Patio » Wed Dec 08, 2010 2:39 am

Tonights progress:
Tonight I started to fix another piece of machinery. It is a belt sander that I acquired. The switch is broken and is difficult to use. So I took it apart and found that the plastic part was what had broken. I did not expect this to be a machining project, so I did not take pictures in the beginning.
The picture below is all the parts of the switch.
IMG00034-20101207-2247.jpg
The red plastic part on the left is the part that broke. The center tang with the hole in it had broken off on one side. To fix it I used a paper clip held in a set of vise grips as a mini welder by heating the paper clip with a torch to red hot and kind of stirring and weaving the molten plastic across the break.
The bent pin in the middle is a rivet that held the whole thing together. I had to grind the end off of it with a dremel tool, which makes it to short to reuse. So off the the lathe I went, to turn a new pin.
This is my first small piece (1/8 diameter) I have turned. It is made from 12L14.
IMG00031-20101207-2240.jpg
Tomorrow I will attempt to put is all back together.
I may have to remake the pin with a center turned in the end for brading the end over, as I am not sure how well I will be able to brad it with out one.
Tomorrow will tell.
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GlennW
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Re: First time poster here, and new to machining!

Post by GlennW » Wed Dec 08, 2010 7:57 am

No need to re-make the pin.

Just chuck it up by the head and indicate the shank in at the end that needs center drilling and drill it!
Glenn

Operating machines is perfectly safe......until you forget how dangerous it really is!

Patio
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Location: Centralia Wa

Re: First time poster here, and new to machining!

Post by Patio » Wed Dec 08, 2010 11:14 pm

Glenn Wegman wrote:No need to re-make the pin.

Just chuck it up by the head and indicate the shank in at the end that needs center drilling and drill it!
Glenn I took your advise and chucked it up in a collet, being as by some miracle the head was exactly 3/16, I used the collet because I only have a 4 jaw chuck at the moment and figured I could make the part again faster than I could indicate it in that. The center drill I have (only one at the moment) was to large, so I chucked up a 1/16 drill bit. I had to move the tail stock over just a bit to get it centered and center punched the part to keep the bit in the right place for drilling.
Here is the pin installed.
IMG00035-20101208-1634.jpg
The switch back in the unit.
IMG00036-20101208-1649.jpg
Here is the unit that needed repairing.
IMG00038-20101208-1654.jpg
One more piece of equipment saved from the land fill, not only that, this once belonged to a now deceased friend of mine.
Tonight I started practicing making flats on the shaper. I need to get my tooling ground right. Tomorrow I am going to try to cut one side of a dovetail.
More later.
Live for the moment!
Prepare for tomorrow!
Forgive the past!

JackF
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Location: Caldwell, Idaho

Re: First time poster here, and new to machining!

Post by JackF » Wed Dec 08, 2010 11:53 pm

Pat,

Now that is what home machining is all about. :D :D

Jack.

Patio
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Location: Centralia Wa

Re: First time poster here, and new to machining!

Post by Patio » Wed Dec 15, 2010 1:36 am

Well the last couple of days I have been messing with the Shaper, as I need it now to make more tooling and other parts.

I learn a little more each day, about machining, whether it is something that I wanted to learn is another matter!

I had finally gotten to the point, in my grinding program, where I could make some tooling for the Logan 7" Shaper I have and get it to make some nice looking chips. I acquired a box of very large, something like 3/8X1 inch by 3 inch long, HSS blanks for some other type of machine, with the package deal, and found they make great tooling because they are really rigid. That is the good news.

I guess this is the part where one pays for machines one way or the other. I bought the Shaper pretty cheaply and now I am probably going to pay, one way or another, to get it working properly. I don't know what the cost is going to be as I am still in the process of trying to figure out the cure.

The first problem, I found, was a broken part in the ram linkage. Looks like it has been broken for some time, and my inexperience with the machine did not help matters. The broken part I think I can make as it is not a precision part. I will need to learn to bore and thread a hole about 2 inches long. That will take some practice, but I think is manageable.

The second problem is that the ram is not cutting parallel with the table. It climbs as it cuts, creating a trapezoidal part. I took some measurements and found a couple of things. First I removed the vice and the tool holder. Then I measured with my dial indicator attached to the face of the ram, and riding across the table, that it had a slight climb of about .001. That I could live with. The problem is with the ram extended, I could lift it by hand with a bit of force about .007 to 010. That I see as a problem. I adjusted the gibs on it several times, even to the point of the locking the ram in place, and still can lift the ram 3 to 5 thousands. I them removed the ram from the Shaper (that is when I found the broken part) and cleaned every part, of the ways and ram, really well, reassemble and no change. Next I went to my local welding shop and bought a can of spray on layout bluing with the intention of finding out how much and where the wear is in the ways. I do not believe spay on bluing is for locating interferences, but is just for laying out, as it is to thick to be of any use for anything else. Live and learn.
So that is where I am at now. Lost.

The questions I have are.
Can I lap the play out of the ways, being as it is climbing as it cuts?
How would I lap it if I could?
Do I have to have the ways ground and scraped?

I do like the idea of having a machine that can make flats with minimal tool investment. Although is might be slow going, I have the time.

Any ideas would be welcome.

I do have a friend coming by tomorrow to have a look. He is also bring me a chunk of metal and end mill to see how well the milling attachment for the lathe will work in making the broken part. He has a mill at his place if all else fails.
Live for the moment!
Prepare for tomorrow!
Forgive the past!

Patio
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Joined: Wed Oct 06, 2010 3:14 pm
Location: Centralia Wa

Re: First time poster here, and new to machining!

Post by Patio » Thu Dec 16, 2010 2:14 am

I have come the the conclusion that I will remake the part for the Shaper, and deal with the inaccuracy of the unit as need be.

Tonight a friend borrowed me a couple of end mills to run in my lathe with the milling attachment. It works well enough for what I need to do. I can mill a part to within a couple thousands of being parallel and probably better if I practice a bit. If I need a part done really well I will go see my friend who borrowed me the tooling he owns a mill. He does not own a lathe so we can help each other out as need be. I will be making him some bushings in the future. :)

For what I bought both the machines for I can not get hurt on the deal, being as the lathe runs well.

Back to the grinding stone to make some more lathe tooling. Next is a boring bar, and inside threading tool.
Live for the moment!
Prepare for tomorrow!
Forgive the past!

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