A Bygone Era

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Douglas1968
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A Bygone Era

Post by Douglas1968 » Mon Feb 12, 2018 5:41 pm

I wonder if these designers were actually considering the beauty of these tools and machines when they sat down at the drafting table. Nothing short of magnificent in my eyes
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johnfreese
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Re: A Bygone Era

Post by johnfreese » Tue Feb 13, 2018 5:34 pm

They managed to make an elegant product without the benefit of industrial designers.

spro
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Re: A Bygone Era

Post by spro » Wed Feb 14, 2018 12:25 am

johnfreese wrote:
Tue Feb 13, 2018 5:34 pm
They managed to make an elegant product without the benefit of industrial designers.
There is a lot which makes sense in the longer view or is it the short view? Anyone can say about the engineering before it went to specs, before it went to actual many steps. Then there were different companies who could cast the parts. I think that rarely we see the fully stylized prototypes. Even after these different steps, there are vestiges of a flair or curve. There were reasons beyond style to have shapes which fit the mechanism and we lost that. Years ago, when the tall stacks were blown up and saving the planet for China. All the pattern makers and castings' productions drew to closure. No problem. It is done on the other side of the world but not for long. Mao mentioned "great leap forward" and to the tune of incomprehensible lives, the blood into the mother earth raised new generations. We see this dearly and not too much.
A leap is slides and housings being square ish. Style or filigery relating to a distant culture (ours) makes no sense.

l

spro
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Re: A Bygone Era

Post by spro » Sat Feb 17, 2018 1:30 am

In a way, I would like to delete the above. I can consider because I already know that "style" plays an important part to a machine. That's just the way it is. Many of the great machines could have had flatter surfaces but the engineers knew stuff. You folks are way above me but an ellipse or curve made more sense than a rectangle in many cases. It doesn't with newer because everything is more flat out production.

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10KPete
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Re: A Bygone Era

Post by 10KPete » Sat Feb 17, 2018 1:56 am

Yup. Can't add to that...

Pete
Just tryin'

Glenn Brooks
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Re: A Bygone Era

Post by Glenn Brooks » Sat Feb 17, 2018 2:37 am

Is that called a ‘Johnson Bar’?

I actually rented one of those devices two years ago from a local rental place in Pennsylvania, when I went tp pick up my 4-4-0 locomotive. Couldn’t believe they were still in use. But a very practical and useful tool.

Glenn
Moderator - Grand Scale Forum

Motive power : 1902 A.S.Campbell 4-4-0 American - 12 5/8" gauge, 1955 Ottaway 4-4-0 American 12" gauge

Ahaha, Retirement: the good life - drifting endlessly on a Sea of projects....

Mr Ron
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Re: A Bygone Era

Post by Mr Ron » Sat Feb 17, 2018 10:43 am

Glenn Brooks wrote:
Sat Feb 17, 2018 2:37 am
Is that called a ‘Johnson Bar’?

I actually rented one of those devices two years ago from a local rental place in Pennsylvania, when I went tp pick up my 4-4-0 locomotive. Couldn’t believe they were still in use. But a very practical and useful tool.

Glenn
I'm not certain, but isn't a johnson bar the throttle on a steam locomotive?
Mr.Ron from South Mississippi

Russ Hanscom
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Re: A Bygone Era

Post by Russ Hanscom » Sat Feb 17, 2018 10:50 am

That handy tool is a lever dolly or machinery mover's lever. Can still be found in McMaster Carr. A very handy home shop project; a bit of oak timber, couple of aluminum disks for wheels and a bit of scrap metal. Made one years ago and use it periodically.

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RichD
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Re: A Bygone Era

Post by RichD » Sat Feb 17, 2018 7:40 pm

"Is that called a ‘Johnson Bar’?"
AKA "Jaw Breaker" for good reason. :roll:
Happy Rails !
RichD
Colorado Midland Ry Ten Wheeler U/C
Kerr Stuart Wren NG 0-4-0 U/C
www.csppry.org
Imagination is your best tool.

spro
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Re: A Bygone Era

Post by spro » Sat Feb 17, 2018 10:50 pm

I knew it was a Johnson Bar but didn't know if the handle was newly made. Either way, they are great things. Look at the wood grain and understand what it signifies. We used to call it "pin oak" around here and maybe that was wrong. It is super tough wood when the grains are right.
Yes "jaw breaker" as if "side show bob" stepped on a rake. I bought mine at a machinery auction and it didn't have the wheels on it. It was great for others to reposition machinery because..
Because without wheels it was the best pry bar ever. You could slam it into narrow openings under the machine base and swivel it to scoot really heavy machines.

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NP317
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Re: A Bygone Era

Post by NP317 » Sun Feb 18, 2018 9:29 pm

Mr Ron wrote:
Sat Feb 17, 2018 10:43 am
Glenn Brooks wrote:
Sat Feb 17, 2018 2:37 am
Is that called a ‘Johnson Bar’?

I actually rented one of those devices two years ago from a local rental place in Pennsylvania, when I went tp pick up my 4-4-0 locomotive. Couldn’t believe they were still in use. But a very practical and useful tool.

Glenn
I'm not certain, but isn't a johnson bar the throttle on a steam locomotive?
A steam locomotive "Johnson Bar" is the valve adjustment handle.
Forward/reverse and increase/decrease steam admission per stroke into the cylinders.
The throttle controls steam to the valves.
~RN

Harold_V
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Re: A Bygone Era

Post by Harold_V » Mon Feb 19, 2018 2:29 am

Glenn Brooks wrote:
Sat Feb 17, 2018 2:37 am
Is that called a ‘Johnson Bar’?
It sure is! Have a look: https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=im ... &FORM=IGRE

H
Wise people talk because they have something to say. Fools talk because they have to say something.

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