Shop realities

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Harold_V
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Re: Shop realities

Post by Harold_V » Sat Nov 03, 2018 4:06 pm

curtis cutter wrote:
Sat Nov 03, 2018 9:47 am
How would you transition to steel coming out of the ground?
It makes more sense to avoid steel entirely. In areas where the line is not at risk of mechanical abrasion, I simply stayed with PVC. Two drops out of the ceiling in my shop, where the exposed PVC is only about three inches long. Where I was concerned, I turned to copper. There's a three foot drop in my basement. Everything protected by drywall is still just PVC. I have yet to plumb the storage containers, but the delivery to them is PVC. I'll likely go to copper again. It's safe, and corrosion isn't an issue. I'm not a fan of steel lines, which eventually rust and dispense particles. That said, all of the outlets in my shop, aside from the two I mentioned, are steel. They are short in length, only about six inches long---enough to get the pipe to the surface of the wall. Each is poured in concrete (my shop is built from foam blocks, with solid grouted cells. The PVC pipe is buried in the cells, fully grouted).

Slip X thread adapters are readily available for all pipe sizes, both male and female, so going from PVC to threaded pipe isn't an issue.

While PVC is treated for ultraviolet, anywhere it's exposed to fluorescent lighting (my shop is so lighted), it's a good idea to not have it exposed.

H
Wise people talk because they have something to say. Fools talk because they have to say something.

curtis cutter
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Re: Shop realities

Post by curtis cutter » Sat Nov 03, 2018 5:42 pm

Harold_V wrote:
Sat Nov 03, 2018 4:06 pm
curtis cutter wrote:
Sat Nov 03, 2018 9:47 am
How would you transition to steel coming out of the ground?
It makes more sense to avoid steel entirely. In areas where the line is not at risk of mechanical abrasion, I simply stayed with PVC. Two drops out of the ceiling in my shop, where the exposed PVC is only about three inches long. Where I was concerned, I turned to copper. There's a three foot drop in my basement. Everything protected by drywall is still just PVC. I have yet to plumb the storage containers, but the delivery to them is PVC. I'll likely go to copper again. It's safe, and corrosion isn't an issue. I'm not a fan of steel lines, which eventually rust and dispense particles. That said, all of the outlets in my shop, aside from the two I mentioned, are steel. They are short in length, only about six inches long---enough to get the pipe to the surface of the wall. Each is poured in concrete (my shop is built from foam blocks, with solid grouted cells. The PVC pipe is buried in the cells, fully grouted).

Slip X thread adapters are readily available for all pipe sizes, both male and female, so going from PVC to threaded pipe isn't an issue.

While PVC is treated for ultraviolet, anywhere it's exposed to fluorescent lighting (my shop is so lighted), it's a good idea to not have it exposed.

H
I just recently added piping suspended under the sheetrock ceiling with drops at various points and a retractable 50' reel on the two post lift. I have been wanting to get rid of the PVC that runs down the outside of the wall and comes through the wall at various points for a long time. Still in the process of finishing up the overhead piping for the full transition.

BTW, my daughter and SIL and kids are moving to near the intersection of Centralia Alpha and 508 today.
Gregg
Just let go of it, it will eventually unplug itself.

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SteveHGraham
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Re: Shop realities

Post by SteveHGraham » Sat Nov 03, 2018 6:50 pm

Harold, what do you do about condensation?

If I ran an air pipe, I would want it big enough for 20 cfm. My current compressor won't pump that much, but my next one might.
Every hard-fried egg began life sunny-side up.

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NP317
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Re: Shop realities

Post by NP317 » Sat Nov 03, 2018 7:00 pm


Harold_V
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Re: Shop realities

Post by Harold_V » Sun Nov 04, 2018 5:33 am

SteveHGraham wrote:
Sat Nov 03, 2018 6:50 pm
Harold, what do you do about condensation?
The only problem I have with water is if I run my blast cabinet for an extended period of time. I don't have a chiller, or even that wouldn't be an issue. For brief operations, the bulk of condensation occurs in the tank. Once the tank warms up, moisture doesn't condense until it gets in the air lines, which apparently stay quite cool, thanks to their concrete sheath.

The water bleed for my air tank (80 gallons) is plumbed directly outside, so draining condensate isn't a big deal. I try to do it once daily, but I don't lose any sleep over it if I miss a day.

I run a 50 year old Quincy 5 horse, which I purchased new, reputed to deliver about 20 cubic feet of air/minute @ 175 pounds. Compressor turns on @ 125 and off @ 175. I run my airlines @ 100 psi.
If I ran an air pipe, I would want it big enough for 20 cfm. My current compressor won't pump that much, but my next one might.
My air lines are all just ½" pipe. I am not aware of any delivery deficiencies, but if you're concerned, move up to 3/4". You gain less line drop as well as a greater capacity. And, if money is no object, there is plastic pipe made specifically for air handling. It's green in color and not cheap. Safe to use---it doesn't fail catastrophically.

Don't skimp when buying a compressor. If you intend to blast, it is my opinion that 20 feet/minute is a minimum. My compressor stays caught up, but it runs almost constantly. When I hit the lottery, I'll buy a larger one, likely a screw type.

Quincy sells one of the best compressors on the market, or they used to. Don't get caught up in the hype of small compressors, most of which can't live up to their ratings.

H
Wise people talk because they have something to say. Fools talk because they have to say something.

Harold_V
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Re: Shop realities

Post by Harold_V » Sun Nov 04, 2018 5:36 am

curtis cutter wrote:
Sat Nov 03, 2018 5:42 pm
BTW, my daughter and SIL and kids are moving to near the intersection of Centralia Alpha and 508 today.
Cool! That's only about three miles from me as the crow flies. A little longer driving, though, but not bad. Mornings are no good (I get up around noon each day).

You are welcome to visit if you're so inclined.

H
Wise people talk because they have something to say. Fools talk because they have to say something.

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SteveHGraham
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Re: Shop realities

Post by SteveHGraham » Sun Nov 04, 2018 10:55 am

Harold_V wrote:
Sun Nov 04, 2018 5:33 am
The only problem I have with water is if I run my blast cabinet for an extended period of time. I don't have a chiller, or even that wouldn't be an issue. For brief operations, the bulk of condensation occurs in the tank. Once the tank warms up, moisture doesn't condense until it gets in the air lines, which apparently stay quite cool, thanks to their concrete sheath.
What do you do about condensate in the underground line?

When I bought my compressor, the biggest one I could find without 3-phase power was 5 HP and 17 CFM, so that's what I have. I don't know how people go bigger without high-end VFD's or phase converters. Perhaps someone here has a clue for me.
Every hard-fried egg began life sunny-side up.

John Hasler
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Re: Shop realities

Post by John Hasler » Sun Nov 04, 2018 11:13 am

Put in a big receiver and keep your average consumption below your compressor capacity.

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liveaboard
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Re: Shop realities

Post by liveaboard » Sun Nov 04, 2018 1:14 pm

I have a 1HP portable compressor that connects to the installed piping + remote timer trigger buttons.
I don't have a sandblaster and 1HP has always been plenty.
I use it most for cleaning things, but also for painting, impact wrench, and of course tire filling.
Mostly I only need air for a few seconds.The small tank fills rapidly; I'm happy not to have a big tank.

I can still disconnect it and use it as a portable but it's not very handy to move.

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BadDog
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Re: Shop realities

Post by BadDog » Sun Nov 04, 2018 2:55 pm

I have a Curtis 80 gal with 5HP baldor motor. But they sell the same unit (including pump) with a 7HP 220V single phase, just a higher rated capacity. I also have a 7 hp Baldor motor I've considered putting on it, but frankly it's not high on my priority list since the one it came with does everything I ask. The only thing that pushes it at all is my big blast cabinet, or the outside tank blaster (what a freaking mess that makes).
Russ
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SteveHGraham
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Re: Shop realities

Post by SteveHGraham » Sun Nov 04, 2018 3:35 pm

I was pleasantly surprised to find that a tiny compressor will run an impact wrench just fine. Buffing...not so much.
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SteveHGraham
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Re: Shop realities

Post by SteveHGraham » Sun Nov 04, 2018 3:42 pm

I don't really know how CFM are measured. I never really thought about it. I guess it must be the pump output, not the flow at the hose end, since any pressurized container will release gas at the same rate through the same size nozzle.

My compressor has a 60-gallon tank and supposedly produces over 17 CFM, and it pressurizes to 175, but it's not hard to overtax it. Those 60 gallons don't last all that long, and 80 wouldn't be much better.
Every hard-fried egg began life sunny-side up.

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