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PostPosted: Wed May 06, 2009 8:31 pm 
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Joined: Sat Nov 11, 2006 12:01 pm
Posts: 123
Location: Arkansas
I need to make a compound Sine Plate about 12 to 14 inches long.

Does anyone have any plans or pics I could use to fabricate one?
Thanks.

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PostPosted: Wed May 06, 2009 8:38 pm 
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Joined: Sun Apr 15, 2007 9:23 am
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Location: Florida
Now that's an ambitious project!!!!

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Glenn

Operating machines is perfectly safe......until you forget how dangerous it really is!


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PostPosted: Wed May 06, 2009 8:46 pm 
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Location: Arkansas
Yes it is. If I ever get one built, I'll post some pics of it.

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PostPosted: Wed May 06, 2009 9:27 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jan 04, 2003 8:33 pm
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Location: 40 Miles West of Chicago/near DeKalb
Bob;

I have made several sine plates. One was 10 or 12 inches.

A sine plate is mostly just a precision hinge. The hinge can be made a number of different ways. The easiest way is to have bushings on half the sine plate and a step pins on the other half to form a hinge. Then a solid pin 5", 6", 10" from the hinge and you have a sine plate. Use a DRO to establish the distance.

You will need to machine some kind of nest for the hinge pins and solid pin to establish a known distance between the pins. You can tilt your mill head to 45 degrees and mill "V" grooves for nests. Another option is to use a ball nose endmill with the same radius as the hinge pins for nests.
If you have a surface grinder, you can grind a "V" groove or dress a radius and grind the nest. The cross feed of a grinder should be precise way for establishing the distance between pins. In all cases the nests will need to be parallel, the same depth and width.

If you already have a sine plate look at how it was made and either copy it or design your own.

The last sine plate marked "77" is 3" X 6" and is a 5" sine plate. I used it very often for 30 years working as a Toolmaker. The size made it handy for grinding and layout purposes. I made the magna sine plate 2 or 3 years ago and it has been handy in my home shop for grinding. I use the magna-sine all the time.
Jim


Attachments:
File comment: Pivot holes for hinge were precision bored in 1977. Swing portion has been carburized and hardened then ground. This was a wonderful sine plate to have. As you can see I had access to a black oxide tank at work. Used it all the time as well.
sine plate 1977.jpg
sine plate 1977.jpg [ 98.86 KiB | Viewed 2709 times ]
File comment: 2.5" sine plate. To use, take values from the 5" sine plate charts and divide by 2. I made this sine plate but don't remember the application.
Sine plate 2.5.jpg
Sine plate 2.5.jpg [ 88.81 KiB | Viewed 2708 times ]
File comment: Sine plate converted to magna-sine with addition of 6 x 6 magnetic chuck from Ebay. Upper part was made of aluminum I guess to resist rust and it was available
magna sine.jpg
magna sine.jpg [ 105.34 KiB | Viewed 2709 times ]

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Last edited by JimGlass on Thu May 07, 2009 2:25 pm, edited 4 times in total.
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PostPosted: Wed May 06, 2009 10:50 pm 
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Location: Florida
I have a compound magna-sine with a hinge setup similar to Jim's last pic, but with adjustable tension. I'll try to remember to get some pics of it tomorrow if that would help. It's 5" centers.

Handy little things they are!

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Glenn

Operating machines is perfectly safe......until you forget how dangerous it really is!


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PostPosted: Thu May 07, 2009 6:58 am 
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Joined: Sun Apr 15, 2007 9:23 am
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Location: Florida
Here's the hinge arrangement and view of the precision surfaces on the lower plate.
Does anyone know the significance of the exactly .100" downward step in the precision surface just to the right of center?

Image

Here's another view of the compound hinge arrangement. The .100" step is in both lower surfaces.

Image

This shows how the hinge bores are split and use a SHCS down through them vertically to set tension or lock the hinge.

Image

Hope this gives you some ideas!

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Glenn

Operating machines is perfectly safe......until you forget how dangerous it really is!


Last edited by Glenn Wegman on Thu May 07, 2009 7:15 am, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: Thu May 07, 2009 7:10 am 
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Joined: Sun Apr 15, 2007 9:23 am
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Location: Florida
Since it's a Sine related thread:

Here's a handy chart for a 5" sine plate or bar someone else might find handy. It's good as long as you don't need too many decimal places! I keep it with the gauge blocks for quick setups so I don't have to search for my calculator (which is always somewhere else) or root through the Machinist Handbook.

Image

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Glenn

Operating machines is perfectly safe......until you forget how dangerous it really is!


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PostPosted: Thu May 07, 2009 8:23 am 
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Joined: Sun Jun 29, 2008 7:46 am
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Location: San Diego
Glenn Wegman wrote:
Does anyone know the significance of the exactly .100" downward step in the precision surface just to the right of center?


This is for setting small angles that require less than a .100 gage block. You merely add .100 to your requires stack and place the blocks down in the lower step.

Gene


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PostPosted: Thu May 07, 2009 8:35 am 
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Joined: Sun Apr 15, 2007 9:23 am
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Location: Florida
Thank you Gene!

Great feature!

The best part is that I never even noticed it was there until I opened it up fully and was wiping it off to take the pics. :oops:
Pretty observant sometimes!

I used shim stock and thickness gauges one time when I needed to grind a very slightly tapered shim!

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Glenn

Operating machines is perfectly safe......until you forget how dangerous it really is!


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PostPosted: Thu May 07, 2009 4:49 pm 
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Joined: Sat Nov 11, 2006 12:01 pm
Posts: 123
Location: Arkansas
Thanks for the pictures gentlemen.

I've got a 15 incher in the shop at work that weights 175 pounds.

I'd like to make one for my home shop thats a bit smaller that I can carry and walk off with. I am well on the way.

I am using some scrap 516 plate that is one inch thick. It cleans up pretty well when put on the surface grinder.

Its sure to be time consuming. Might take me forever to build the thing.

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Bob


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 Post subject: Sine Plate
PostPosted: Sat May 09, 2009 11:22 pm 
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Joined: Thu Apr 09, 2009 10:58 am
Posts: 374
Location: San Clemente, CA
I have a sine plate I made about 10 years ago and I have used it about twice. It is a 10 inch sine plate with 1 inch rolls. It is made of 6061 aluminum and has a hole pattern for 3/8-16 screws on 1 inch centers.

If you're interested, I'll take $150.00 for it, and I'll pay the shipping.

If interested, you can reach me at 714-420-2453


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