Search found 2831 matches

by Fender
Tue Jun 23, 2020 8:33 pm
Forum: Live Steam
Topic: Topic For Discussion
Replies: 28
Views: 6487

Re: Topic For Discussion

Another way of looking at this is the size of the locomotive/equipment. Can you have a lot of fun running an engine that weighs 100-150 lbs? Yes. Is a larger locomotive more impressive? Yes. Is the larger locomotive more of a PITA to build, move, load and transport? Yes! The gauge is not really the ...
by Fender
Mon Jun 22, 2020 7:27 am
Forum: Live Steam
Topic: For Climax Builders
Replies: 4
Views: 1838

Re: For Climax Builders

Thanks very much for posting this! These dimensions together with the detailed component photos of the class B Climax 1694 (Puffing Billy Railway) in Australia are a great reference.
by Fender
Sat Jun 20, 2020 8:19 pm
Forum: Live Steam
Topic: Calculating boiler size
Replies: 5
Views: 1784

Re: Calculating boiler size

Also, consider the fuel type in your boiler design. Boilers for propane may be a little different than those for coal or wood. Typically, coal boilers benefit from larger tubes and firebox surface. Propane can use more, but smaller tubes, because more of the evaporation occurs there.
by Fender
Fri Jun 19, 2020 1:03 pm
Forum: Live Steam
Topic: water level, boiler
Replies: 7
Views: 1817

Re: water level, boiler

Some people have put a white plastic ball in the glass that floats on top of the water.
by Fender
Tue Jun 16, 2020 9:14 pm
Forum: Live Steam
Topic: 2020 A3 1.5 scale build
Replies: 14
Views: 3838

Re: 2020 A3 1.5 scale build

With coal I would definitely go with the larger tube size. Most of the heat transfer occurs in the firebox when using coal as fuel. Any loss of heating area in the larger (but fewer) tubes will be offset by greater flow area through them and less clogging with cinders. You could even consider going ...
by Fender
Sat Jun 06, 2020 4:41 pm
Forum: Live Steam
Topic: Scale
Replies: 13
Views: 3341

Re: Scale

The oddball ratio is because the 2.5" track gauge doesn't exactly match half-inch scale. 2.5” gauge for 1/2” scale is more of a British thing. Here in the U.S. designers such as H.J. Coventry designed their locomotives to 17/32” = 1’ scale on 2.5” gauge track. Keith Interesting. If you divide 17/32...
by Fender
Sat Jun 06, 2020 12:41 pm
Forum: Live Steam
Topic: Scale
Replies: 13
Views: 3341

Re: Scale

I'm sure the O.P.'s question deals with the current topic "Decauville 0-4-0.." which is stated to be 2.5" gauge. So I think Anthony's explanation is correct. More commonly 2.5" gauge is associated with one-half inch scale, or 1:24 ratio, but calculating the scale and gauge more exactly, it is 1:22.5...
by Fender
Sat Jun 06, 2020 10:53 am
Forum: Live Steam
Topic: Scale
Replies: 13
Views: 3341

Re: Scale

G-gauge track (aka #1 gauge) is a popular size for models now, and is 1.75 inches between the rails. Many narrow-gauge railroads overseas were built to meter gauge, or 39.37 inches between the rails. So models of meter gauge engines running on G-gauge track are built to a scale of 1.75 : 39.37, equi...
by Fender
Wed Jun 03, 2020 1:36 pm
Forum: Live Steam
Topic: Water Gauge Problem
Replies: 13
Views: 3704

Re: Water Gauge Problem

After a while we opened the blow down valve. After the water stopped for some reason I opened the bottom connection from the gauge to the boiler. Water began to came out the the boiler from both the blow down as well as the open connection. The water gauge had water bubbling up much like a lava lam...
by Fender
Tue Jun 02, 2020 3:55 pm
Forum: Live Steam
Topic: ISO: Class A Climax information
Replies: 4
Views: 1638

Re: ISO: Class A Climax information

Precision Locomotive Castings offers castings for a class A Climax in 2.5” scale. They are beautiful steel castings:
http://www.precisionlocomotivecastings.com/
by Fender
Sat May 23, 2020 9:26 pm
Forum: Live Steam
Topic: Bunting P43-4
Replies: 8
Views: 2602

Re: Bunting P43-4

The SAE specification for sintered bronze Oil-impregnated bearings is SAE 841, aka “Oilite. Cast bronze is SAE 660, aka C93200 alloy.
by Fender
Tue May 19, 2020 7:11 pm
Forum: Live Steam
Topic: Camelbacks
Replies: 14
Views: 6677

Re: Camelbacks

Check out the movie “Juggernaut” on youtube. com. Produced in 1915, it has a scene showing a camelback pulling a three-car train falling through a wooden trestle. Obviously not filmed in California (no anthracite-fueled camelbacks operated in California!).