Flux Core fumes

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tornitore45
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Flux Core fumes

Post by tornitore45 » Sun Sep 13, 2020 6:50 pm

I have a cheap crappy $100 Flux Core Wire welder for Harbor Freight, however I suspect it could do a better job in the hand of somebody that knows what is doing.

Any way whatever is in the core splatters and fumes. How toxic are those fumes? I learned the hard way how bad Silver brazing can be.
Mauro Gaetano
in Austin TX

Russ Hanscom
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Re: Flux Core fumes

Post by Russ Hanscom » Sun Sep 13, 2020 8:02 pm

Might look at the MSDS (material safety data sheet) for the wire you are using. It will emphasize the worst issues.

Any welding should be done in a well ventilated area, just in case.

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Re: Flux Core fumes

Post by Harold_V » Mon Sep 14, 2020 1:04 am

tornitore45 wrote:
Sun Sep 13, 2020 6:50 pm
I learned the hard way how bad Silver brazing can be.
Wow! That can prove deadly! Cadmium is used to control oxidation of the copper in (some) silver solder. It is a known killer.

Could you please provide some details of your experience?

H
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liveaboard
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Re: Flux Core fumes

Post by liveaboard » Mon Sep 14, 2020 4:07 am

I poisoned myself stick welding [indoors] the other day. I had a headache and burning lungs.
Fume hood or weld outside.
But don't start any fires!
I find a bucket of water to be effective for dousing small incendiary events.

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tornitore45
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Re: Flux Core fumes

Post by tornitore45 » Mon Sep 14, 2020 2:39 pm

I was doing 5 or 6 small jobs that did not need prolonged heating so I did not bother to set up outside. After the 3rd or 4th job I felt progressively a stomach ache that became worst even after I quit. I also felt a bit hazy. I looked up the symptoms and based on that I thought that drinking water was possibly beneficial. The therapy is gastric flush so I though drinking was the closest thing I could do on the spot. It took about 20 minutes to start feel better.
My original post was stupid anyway, I should know better that that kind of work should be done outside with ventilation.
Mauro Gaetano
in Austin TX

Harold_V
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Re: Flux Core fumes

Post by Harold_V » Mon Sep 14, 2020 2:50 pm

Thanks.
When I designed my shop, I included a large ventilation fan above the weld table, one with automatic louvers. An opposing window (opposite wall) allows for good air movement, so I can weld or braze inside without worry. The fan has proven to be a good idea, as I use it to remove fumes from the use of sulfur based cutting oils, too. I simply open the appropriate window, be it mill or lathe work, and run the fan.

H
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Re: Flux Core fumes

Post by John Hasler » Wed Sep 16, 2020 10:41 am

Harold_V wrote:
Mon Sep 14, 2020 1:04 am
tornitore45 wrote:
Sun Sep 13, 2020 6:50 pm
I learned the hard way how bad Silver brazing can be.
Wow! That can prove deadly! Cadmium is used to control oxidation of the copper in (some) silver solder. It is a known killer.

Could you please provide some details of your experience?

H
The symptoms of acute[1] cadmium poisoning are respiratory, not gastric. Basically, metal fume fever. It is most hazardous as a long term cumulative poison, though.

[1] "Acute" in this context means immediate, not severe.

Eoinfork
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Re: Flux Core fumes

Post by Eoinfork » Tue Dec 01, 2020 8:29 am

MSDS are good option

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Re: Flux Core fumes

Post by Glenn Brooks » Thu Mar 18, 2021 11:47 pm

Ozone exposure is also a pretty common side affect from welding. Every welding process creates high ozone concentration near the weld site, due to the electric arc interacting with oxygen in the air. Couple of years ago I hovered to close over a bunch of weldments and came down with a form of ozone induced pneumonia. Couldn’t breath, constantly nauseated for weeks. Lasted for 6 weeks, which is apparently fairly common with ozone exposure.

Now days I usually set up a small, portable, high volume 8” mine rescue fan in the far side of my shop to create a constant air circulation when welding. The fan shoots a nice column of air across the work, constantly wiping the welding products out the open the door, next to my table table.

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BigDumbDinosaur
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Re: Flux Core fumes

Post by BigDumbDinosaur » Fri Mar 19, 2021 1:45 am

Glenn Brooks wrote:
Thu Mar 18, 2021 11:47 pm
Now days I usually set up a small, portable, high volume 8” mine rescue fan in the far side of my shop to create a constant air circulation when welding. The fan shoots a nice column of air across the work, constantly wiping the welding products out the open the door, next to my table table.
Any time I am welding, I have a fan running that blows upward to keep the air moving. I mostly use MIG, which usually produces little smoke, but there is the ozone-generation problem, as well as the discharge of the shielding gas (usually 75/25). I can't have the fan blowing directly at the work area, as it will interfere with the shielding gas.
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Re: Flux Core fumes

Post by Glenn Brooks » Fri Mar 19, 2021 11:54 am

I just have a stick machine, partly due to not having to deal with shielding gas. Although it’s a very dirty clean up process, and the welding byproducts are a lot worse than the fumes from Mig or TIG. Lots of discussion on our local Metalheads forum recently about overhead exhaust- although you are still right in the way of the rising fumes. Good thing about stick is you can use it in a typhoon.

Ive also thought about a combo respirator /face shield hood. They are gaining popularity, but still pretty spendy.

Glenn
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Re: Flux Core fumes

Post by heislerboy » Fri Mar 19, 2021 3:57 pm

Glenn Brooks, no you can't use stick welding in a typhoon, the max wind speed to weld in is 5 miles per hour this is from AWS (American Weld Society) in all types of welding and it is in all there welding codes. I am a certified welder in structural code D1.1 .

Andrew

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