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casting in the third world

Posted: Wed Jul 17, 2019 4:26 pm
by liveaboard
Someone shared this on another forum; I thought it needs to be seen here too.

Just imagine, OSHA inspector goes on vacation to Vietnam, sees this on the roadside;


Re: casting in the third world

Posted: Wed Jul 17, 2019 8:24 pm
by RONALD
Third World was our world in 1906!

Photo #1: Below is a 1906 Photo out of a book on crucibles, how many OSHA violations can you find.

( I had put this on before.)

Photo #2: Here are Ean and I dressed to make OSHA happy!
DSCN2678_2.jpeg
DSCN0029.jpeg

Re: casting in the third world

Posted: Wed Jul 17, 2019 11:07 pm
by DavidF
What personal safety equipment would have been readily available to a foundry man in 1906 ??

Re: casting in the third world

Posted: Thu Jul 18, 2019 1:52 am
by Harold_V
I'm astounded at the outstanding results achieved with virtually no equipment.
Imagine casting any metal in bare feet!

H

Re: casting in the third world

Posted: Thu Jul 18, 2019 3:37 am
by mihit
I do a bit of casting. Usually in shorts, crocs, no gloves (Cast Iron I use gloves cos it's really freakin hot and my tongs are too short)

The body has it's own very good pre-warning systems. IE you know when you're too close to something hot because it gets uncomfortable, so you move away.
If you don kevlar sleeves and asbestos gloves, you might not feel it until it's a serious problem.

There's one video I came across on youtube where they hunt ore, build a clay bloomery powered by one guy tamping sticks, forge the bloom in a similar manner, and shape, sharpen and fit an axe. They wear shorts (and nothing else) and the technology is quite literally sticks and mud. ' to mention that for hundreds if not thousands of years the english, scots, and japs all worked steel wearing aught more than rags. OSH be damned. Common sense ain't so common no more.

Re: casting in the third world

Posted: Thu Jul 18, 2019 3:39 am
by mihit
DavidF wrote:
Wed Jul 17, 2019 11:07 pm
What personal safety equipment would have been readily available to a foundry man in 1906 ??
All the stuff between his ears.

Re: casting in the third world

Posted: Thu Jul 18, 2019 3:41 am
by mihit

Re: casting in the third world

Posted: Wed Jul 31, 2019 2:40 am
by spro
I watched the first video. It is striking in many ways. Those guys knew how to do this. Great care with the sand molds and intuition born of experience. Those "core boxes" are right sturdy. There was grinding and some smaller wheel used, probably knotted wire worn to usable level again. During the watch, a banner said "roasted chestnuts and black sand" . Either way, frugal and cool.

Re: casting in the third world

Posted: Wed Jul 31, 2019 3:08 am
by spro
mihit. I watched that video. What are the words anymore. So much there in the earth we take for granite.

Re: casting in the third world

Posted: Wed Jul 31, 2019 12:26 pm
by Mr Ron
Near the end of the video, the guy was grinding with an electric grinder and standing on wet ground. I hope it was double insulated. Maybe it came from Harbor Freight.
I took a class in foundry back in 1950 at Pratt Institute college in Brooklyn, N.Y. I recall we wore old pants that could be tossed, long sleeves and safety glasses. That was all. If I learned anything in college, it was to never work in a foundry.

Re: casting in the third world

Posted: Wed Jul 31, 2019 12:30 pm
by John Hasler
DavidF wrote:
Wed Jul 17, 2019 11:07 pm
What personal safety equipment would have been readily available to a foundry man in 1906 ??
Boots, long trousers, and overalls. All of which those guys are wearing.

Re: casting in the third world

Posted: Wed Jul 31, 2019 3:43 pm
by Harold_V
Mr Ron wrote:
Wed Jul 31, 2019 12:26 pm
If I learned anything in college, it was to never work in a foundry.
As much as foundry work fascinates me, I came to the same conclusion as a young lad when I'd visit a couple of local foundries and watch the workers ram up molds. It's hard and dirty work, a tough way to make a living.

It still fascinates me! :wink:

H