McENGLEVAN furnace

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Wanna-Be
Posts: 461
Joined: Mon Nov 14, 2005 9:17 am
Location: Brady, WA

McENGLEVAN furnace

Post by Wanna-Be » Mon Apr 19, 2010 8:36 am

I just got back from the Small Farmers Journal auction in Madras OR. (I'm not a small farmer, but hauled a load of horse drawn equipment there for the auction). I love auctions and can't stand to drive home with an empty trailer and money in my pocket.
I found a McENGLEVAN MP36 multi-purpose gas fired furnace in the Blacksmith section. Very lightly used, bricks still in perfect condition, with a crucible rest. However, there were no crucibles or tongs, etc..
According to the manual, included, this model was for General Metal Shops in trade schools. It has drop down doors on both sides to allow longer items to be heated in the middle, a removable plug in the top opening for crucible or pot melting. It can accomodate a #4 crucible with a charge of about 4 lb of aluminum or 12 lb of brass. The temp is sufficient for gray cast iron (2400 deg. F). and it rated at 128,000 btu/hr.

I have never done any foundry work myself, however, I had foundries and pattern shops in my division while on several USN repair ships. I use to hang out there and learn what I could. (now I'm here and hope to learn more.)

I have a pretty complete machine shop, even though I am not an accomplished machinist (still learning at age 72 :D ). I plan to use this furnace for casing small parts from alum., brass and bronze. I under stand steel is much more difficult. Since I have a gear cutting machine (straight cut) I want to cast spoked gear blanks for old machine restorations.

I also want to learn about heat treating, because this furnace will be perfect for that application.

I just found a small Muller and some flasks on CL and have to go look at those this week. (there goes my grand kids inharetence)

Contact me if anyone knows of some small crucibles, cheap. I'm considering trying to make my own for lead and aluminum and see there is a book around on making them from clay DIY.

Pictures to follow.

Steve
Jet vert Mill, Champion 12X30 lathe, Amer. Mach. Tool radial drill, 24X60 LeBlond lathe, Scharmann 3" Hrz Brg Mill, Steptoe 18" Shaper, S/B Shaper,B&S (No.4 36") Gear Cutting Mach., Verson 22.5T Press Brake, Enco 12" hrz. saw, McEnglevan foundry furnace, Rockwell 14X42 lathe, K&T 2H univ horz. mill,DoAll 16-2 Vrt. bandsaw,Canedy-Otto drill press,Buffalo Iron Worker

Wanna-Be
Posts: 461
Joined: Mon Nov 14, 2005 9:17 am
Location: Brady, WA

Re: McENGLEVAN furnace

Post by Wanna-Be » Mon Apr 19, 2010 6:01 pm

I got a tank of propane and regulator. Put the furnace on a dolly and carted it outside the shop door and hooked it up to gas and elect.

Since it doesn't have an ignitor I used a small propane torch and lite it with both drop-down doors down and the top plug removed. It lite and sputtered a bit until the air was out of the fuel hose. Then the I just set it on low for a while to let the bricks dry out,

Eventually I figured I might has well do something productive, so I picked up and old axle that I had cut in half and put it in to the furnace for an anneal. Since I didn't have a pyrometer I just had to guess at the temp.

Finally shut it down and let it cool down with the doors open and the axle in some sand.

Earlier, I had talked to the mfg, MIFCO and they still make this model but they now come with auto ingnition, flame sensor and optional temp control. Since mine is Ser. #030 I'm told it was built in 1969 and those features weren't offered until 1971. It appears mine is still all OEM brick work and in near new condition. Not bad for 41 years old. I only had to replace the power cord.

The pressure regulator and hose cost more than I paid for the furnace, but that is how thing go when you get something for practically nothing. No complains here. :mrgreen:

Steve
Jet vert Mill, Champion 12X30 lathe, Amer. Mach. Tool radial drill, 24X60 LeBlond lathe, Scharmann 3" Hrz Brg Mill, Steptoe 18" Shaper, S/B Shaper,B&S (No.4 36") Gear Cutting Mach., Verson 22.5T Press Brake, Enco 12" hrz. saw, McEnglevan foundry furnace, Rockwell 14X42 lathe, K&T 2H univ horz. mill,DoAll 16-2 Vrt. bandsaw,Canedy-Otto drill press,Buffalo Iron Worker

Harold_V
Posts: 17661
Joined: Fri Dec 20, 2002 11:02 pm
Location: Onalaska, WA USA

Re: McENGLEVAN furnace

Post by Harold_V » Tue Apr 20, 2010 12:34 am

Steve,
There's a guy that lives in Elma that may be of some service to you. His name is William J. Posey, Sr.. He was, at one time, foundry manager of Quali-Cast foundry in Chehalis.

I haven't talked to him in a few years, but I know that he retired a few years ago due to health reasons. Should you be successful in making contact, he could prove to be a wealth of knowledge.

Harold

Wanna-Be
Posts: 461
Joined: Mon Nov 14, 2005 9:17 am
Location: Brady, WA

Re: McENGLEVAN furnace

Post by Wanna-Be » Tue Apr 20, 2010 12:44 am

Thanks for the tip. I just happen to live about 6 miles from Elma and will make a point of looking him up.

It's a small world! :mrgreen:

Steve
Jet vert Mill, Champion 12X30 lathe, Amer. Mach. Tool radial drill, 24X60 LeBlond lathe, Scharmann 3" Hrz Brg Mill, Steptoe 18" Shaper, S/B Shaper,B&S (No.4 36") Gear Cutting Mach., Verson 22.5T Press Brake, Enco 12" hrz. saw, McEnglevan foundry furnace, Rockwell 14X42 lathe, K&T 2H univ horz. mill,DoAll 16-2 Vrt. bandsaw,Canedy-Otto drill press,Buffalo Iron Worker

Wanna-Be
Posts: 461
Joined: Mon Nov 14, 2005 9:17 am
Location: Brady, WA

Re: McENGLEVAN furnace (pics)

Post by Wanna-Be » Tue Apr 20, 2010 11:41 am

I took some picture of this furnace and am uploading them with this post.

I also have a question about the clearance around the crucible in the top opening. I am having problems finding the NO. 4 size that it recommended. I think I will end up making my own and have purchase a copy of the Gingery's book.

This furnace has fire brick with vent openings in each corner and the opening for the crucible is 6 1/2" dia.. The pedestal on the floor of the firebox is about 8" from the top of the fire brick.

How much clearance should I have around the crucible or pot (not sure which is which)?? I see in the manual that one goes inside with the plug in the top and the other stands 'proud' above the furnace top. What are the advantages of either??

Thanks for the great forum.

Steve
Attachments
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Jet vert Mill, Champion 12X30 lathe, Amer. Mach. Tool radial drill, 24X60 LeBlond lathe, Scharmann 3" Hrz Brg Mill, Steptoe 18" Shaper, S/B Shaper,B&S (No.4 36") Gear Cutting Mach., Verson 22.5T Press Brake, Enco 12" hrz. saw, McEnglevan foundry furnace, Rockwell 14X42 lathe, K&T 2H univ horz. mill,DoAll 16-2 Vrt. bandsaw,Canedy-Otto drill press,Buffalo Iron Worker

tomc
Posts: 343
Joined: Sun Oct 16, 2005 7:04 pm
Location: Sw of the Windy City

Re: McENGLEVAN furnace

Post by tomc » Tue Apr 20, 2010 11:58 am

Steve,

You only need enough room to get your lifting tool around the crucible.

Tom C.
tom_at_srclry_com
Lost somewhere in Michigan!

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