Q: Least damaging way of removing id markings on tools

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diyer
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Q: Least damaging way of removing id markings on tools

Post by diyer » Thu Jun 18, 2015 2:37 pm

Hello, got a practical question about something I find myself dealing with continuously, not daily, but certainly enough to be bothersome and time consuming. My question is, what is the least damaging method of removing names, initials, id markings on tools? I buy some of my tools from Internet sites, for various reasons. It seems the sellers like to hide that information, or perhaps they don't think it is significant enough to mention it. But I really dislike someone else's name on my tools. I can remove it but not without damaging the finish. Some of the markings seem to be much deeper than they look. I have tried files, not so great, emery cloth scratches and dulls it and wont remove the mark easily, takes a tremendous amount of effort. I was thinking of a mini grinder like a dremel or die grinder, they are much faster. Any ideas?
Last edited by diyer on Fri Jun 19, 2015 1:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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SteveM
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Re: Q: Least damaging way of removing id markings on tools

Post by SteveM » Thu Jun 18, 2015 6:21 pm

I think there's no really good answer.

Dremel / die grinder has the advantage of confining it to a small area. You can start with one grit and finish with another.

I don't have a problem with the names on my tools; I have more of a problem with the botch job some people have done trying to remove them.

For you, trying to keep the damage to a minimum, I think it's just going to be a matter of time and effort.

Steve

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neanderman
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Re: Q: Least damaging way of removing id markings on tools

Post by neanderman » Thu Jun 18, 2015 6:28 pm

I kind of like seeing a name on my tools. It tells me that the owner valued them and probably made his living with them. I have some of my grandfather's and father's tools and I'm really glad those have their names on them.
Ed

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silence dogood
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Re: Q: Least damaging way of removing id markings on tools

Post by silence dogood » Thu Jun 18, 2015 8:40 pm

I'm with neanderman. My father-in-law was a machinist and owned a 10" Sheldon. It was his pride and joy. He taught my son how to use it. The old man is gone now, but my son has his lathe. Ed completely rebuilt that machine to its original glory. In restoring it, there was one thing that my son did not do. In the corner on the bed, the old man stamped his name on it. It stayed. Mark

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steamin10
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Re: Q: Least damaging way of removing id markings on tools

Post by steamin10 » Fri Jun 19, 2015 11:45 am

I buy used and abused tools. Many have marks, initials, crap stamped on them. I dont worry about sockets, but any hand wrenches, go to the ped grinder, and they get taken off, wherever possible. I use a vibro-pen to make my mark there, last 4 #'s of my SS. to identify them. This is a convention that has traced stolen tools for me, and got a conviction. Likewise, if you are buying tools from an individual, or pawn, removing ID and saved receipts are crucial, should any fingers point your way. There is no nice way to remove such marks, and the plating removed allows inevitable rust. But for about a $1 a wrench, I dont care much.

One person caught and found guilty was only given 1 yr in jail, for many thousands of dollars in theft. It is part of our world, there are thieves among us, that would tear the fabric of our society apart, without appreciation. Like a pig with a pearl necklace. I am still smarting over the last theft, rotab, dial indicators and new collet sets for R-8. I pledge to get even, as they snear at me in talks. Nough said.
Big Dave, former Millwright, Electrician, Environmental conditioning, and back yard Fixxit guy. Now retired, persuing boats, trains, and broken relics.
We have enough youth, how about a fountain of Smart. My computer beat me at chess, but not kickboxing
It is not getting caught in the rain, its learning to dance in it. People saying good morning, should have to prove it.

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diyer
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Re: Q: Least damaging way of removing id markings on tools

Post by diyer » Fri Jun 19, 2015 1:58 pm

silence dogood wrote:I'm with neanderman. My father-in-law was a machinist and owned a 10" Sheldon. It was his pride and joy. He taught my son how to use it. The old man is gone now, but my son has his lathe. Ed completely rebuilt that machine to its original glory. In restoring it, there was one thing that my son did not do. In the corner on the bed, the old man stamped his name on it. It stayed. Mark
Well, to me that's different, its family, and I have those hand me downs as well and leave them intact. But I kinda doubt that 99% of the people would want a strangers name on their stuff. I had tool dealers tell me they refused to warranty marked tools, they claim that altered the tool and voided the warranty, almost to the point of being bullies about it..
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diyer
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Re: Q: Least damaging way of removing id markings on tools

Post by diyer » Fri Jun 19, 2015 3:30 pm

steamin10 wrote:I buy used and abused tools. Many have marks, initials, crap stamped on them. I dont worry about sockets, but any hand wrenches, go to the ped grinder, and they get taken off, wherever possible. I use a vibro-pen to make my mark there, last 4 #'s of my SS. to identify them. This is a convention that has traced stolen tools for me, and got a conviction. Likewise, if you are buying tools from an individual, or pawn, removing ID and saved receipts are crucial, should any fingers point your way. There is no nice way to remove such marks, and the plating removed allows inevitable rust. But for about a $1 a wrench, I dont care much.

One person caught and found guilty was only given 1 yr in jail, for many thousands of dollars in theft. It is part of our world, there are thieves among us, that would tear the fabric of our society apart, without appreciation. Like a pig with a pearl necklace. I am still smarting over the last theft, rotab, dial indicators and new collet sets for R-8. I pledge to get even, as they snear at me in talks. Nough said.
Steamin, so sorry to hear that. But glad you got the SOB. I hope you get the justice you deserve -- I think the main part of the sentence should always be restitution. Guys like that think nothing of spending a year in the slammer. I was almost a law clerk once, eventually to become a lawyer. Had two job offers. But I turned down the offers, knowing I could never enjoy the work. I found it be too stressful having to work with the scumbag attorneys and judges who only care about wining, not the truth -- money worshipers!

I got to thinking that if my garage door was left opened mistakenly, its like an invitation for thieves. So, I thought, buy a metal tool box -- problem is they can be opened. Then I figured they might not take the time to open it, making lots of noise, etc. But then I thought, wouldn't it just be easier to roll the entire box and contents quickly into a van/truck -- my neighbors would probably think they were contractors hired for work. In fact, I am hearing lots of stories by people that daytime robberies are more common and easier than the classic case of a thief snooping around in the dark, So, then I thought perhaps I need to remove the wheels and cement the box legs into the floor. I'm not sure what the best method is!
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steamin10
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Re: Q: Least damaging way of removing id markings on tools

Post by steamin10 » Sat Jun 20, 2015 12:18 pm

Son has a very large Snapon box. It is chained to the floor by a mounting plate, that is not readily accessed. Its value is about 27K on inventory replacement value. The Railroad asked him to remove the box as they could not insure it for value, after he turned in his list. he now has a smaller box without as many goodies on site. He has an open box policy appreciated by most, abused by a very few about using tools when he is on site, for the little tools that make jobs easier.

As for general theft, I have had renters that do not observe the normal conventions. I have been abused with vengeful destruction, and have landed several lawsuits. The problem is tracking people that are unstable, as they appear homeless after a while, and begin to live underground. It is sad that there is not a better way to get compensated for your loss without losing your shirt to lawyers, that dont support the community, only to line their own pockets. But gunslingers must be paid, and that cost is high, So, I keep my ducks in a row, and spend the time to go pro-se, with simple damage cases. There is a certain satisfaction, to see an individual dressed down before a judge, but suspended sentences, and a mobile society, prevent good solutions, as many legal rulings fail when they move out of state. I know the bitter taste of winning nothing.
Big Dave, former Millwright, Electrician, Environmental conditioning, and back yard Fixxit guy. Now retired, persuing boats, trains, and broken relics.
We have enough youth, how about a fountain of Smart. My computer beat me at chess, but not kickboxing
It is not getting caught in the rain, its learning to dance in it. People saying good morning, should have to prove it.

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SteveM
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Re: Q: Least damaging way of removing id markings on tools

Post by SteveM » Sat Jun 20, 2015 7:02 pm

diyer wrote:....So, I thought, buy a metal tool box -- problem is they can be opened. Then I figured they might not take the time to open it, making lots of noise, etc. But then I thought, wouldn't it just be easier to roll the entire box and contents quickly into a van/truck -- my neighbors would probably think they were contractors hired for work. In fact, I am hearing lots of stories by people that daytime robberies are more common and easier than the classic case of a thief snooping around in the dark, So, then I thought perhaps I need to remove the wheels and cement the box legs into the floor. I'm not sure what the best method is!
One thing you can do is to bolt together a multi-section box, so they have to pick up the whole thing or nothing.

It's too easy to carry away the top box.

Steve

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steamin10
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Re: Q: Least damaging way of removing id markings on tools

Post by steamin10 » Sun Jun 21, 2015 11:42 am

It is a solution I have obtained casters of 5 inch, and some 2x2 angle for a frame, to carry two of my aging Crapsman tool boxes to revamp my storage. I have 5 roll around boxes with various top cabs, and I intend to consolidate my tools (does that mean sort?) from the mash it has become to some sensible order. Make no mistake, locking bars, and chains to the wall (floor) are a deterrent, but not the total answer.
Big Dave, former Millwright, Electrician, Environmental conditioning, and back yard Fixxit guy. Now retired, persuing boats, trains, and broken relics.
We have enough youth, how about a fountain of Smart. My computer beat me at chess, but not kickboxing
It is not getting caught in the rain, its learning to dance in it. People saying good morning, should have to prove it.

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diyer
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Re: Q: Least damaging way of removing id markings on tools

Post by diyer » Mon Jun 22, 2015 3:16 pm

steamin10 wrote: . . . As for general theft, I have had renters that do not observe the normal conventions. I have been abused with vengeful destruction, and have landed several lawsuits. The problem is tracking people that are unstable, as they appear homeless after a while, and begin to live underground. It is sad that there is not a better way to get compensated for your loss without losing your shirt to lawyers, that dont support the community, only to line their own pockets. But gunslingers must be paid, and that cost is high, So, I keep my ducks in a row, and spend the time to go pro-se, with simple damage cases. There is a certain satisfaction, to see an individual dressed down before a judge, but suspended sentences, and a mobile society, prevent good solutions, as many legal rulings fail when they move out of state. I know the bitter taste of winning nothing.
I remember talking to a Police Officer once, I forget what the topic was, but he said, "Justice is worse than the crime!"

The legal system has always been for the wealthy. Its ineffective and meaningless for the common man, because it has evolved to be a monster in and of itself. It will suck the time out of your life . . . and life will pass you by. I believe an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

I'd like to read some threads about how people protect their personal property. Do you know if that topic has ever been discussed here. I haven't done a search, its just something I've been wondering about.
Last edited by diyer on Wed Jun 24, 2015 3:16 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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diyer
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Re: Q: Least damaging way of removing id markings on tools

Post by diyer » Mon Jun 22, 2015 3:53 pm

steamin10 wrote:It is a solution I have obtained casters of 5 inch, and some 2x2 angle for a frame, to carry two of my aging Crapsman tool boxes to revamp my storage. I have 5 roll around boxes with various top cabs, and I intend to consolidate my tools (does that mean sort?) from the mash it has become to some sensible order. Make no mistake, locking bars, and chains to the wall (floor) are a deterrent, but not the total answer.
As well as video cameras, motion detectors, maybe a vicious watch dog? But actually when does theft happen at your home, only when your not there, right? So, it must be based on information thieves get. How do they get it? Internet? Well, your example was your neighbor knew. So, the elements seem to be two criteria: Knowledge of what someone has and enough time to safely remove the items. Some theft is domestic in nature, but that's another matter.

No need to respond. I think this topic should be discussed in its own thread. But thanks for the information.
Last edited by diyer on Wed Jun 24, 2015 3:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"When you have both a secret government and an open government -- you have a secret government."

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