Amazing machine work

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curtis cutter
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Location: Curtis, WA

Re: Amazing machine work

Post by curtis cutter » Sun Dec 15, 2019 1:06 pm

BigDumbDinosaur wrote:
Sun Dec 15, 2019 12:34 pm
curtis cutter wrote:
Sun Dec 15, 2019 10:07 am
Here is a PDF link with a facility description.

file:///C:/Users/nwrai/Downloads/052_Jackson_Prairie.pdf
A link pointing to a file ensconced on a hard drive isn't going work over the Internet. :D
I tried to find something to link easily to that described the facility but could not find anything of much value. I had to resort to just a copy and paste on the search. Sorry, maybe someone more technically savvy can help.
Gregg
Just let go of it, it will eventually unplug itself.

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BigDumbDinosaur
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Re: Amazing machine work

Post by BigDumbDinosaur » Sun Dec 15, 2019 2:02 pm

curtis cutter wrote:
Sun Dec 15, 2019 1:06 pm
BigDumbDinosaur wrote:
Sun Dec 15, 2019 12:34 pm
curtis cutter wrote:
Sun Dec 15, 2019 10:07 am
Here is a PDF link with a facility description.

file:///C:/Users/nwrai/Downloads/052_Jackson_Prairie.pdf
A link pointing to a file ensconced on a hard drive isn't going work over the Internet. :D
I tried to find something to link easily to that described the facility but could not find anything of much value. I had to resort to just a copy and paste on the search. Sorry, maybe someone more technically savvy can help.
You should be able to attach a PDF to a message posted here. PDF is a good choice, as the file structure is portable, meaning can be accessed by any computer that has the Adobe reader installed. Also, unlike some other file formats, e.g., Microsoft Office files, PDF is safe, in that attaching malware to one is an exercise in futility—the Adobe reader will not open a PDF that has been corrupted in any way.
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I'm an old guy. What's your excuse? ☻

pete
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Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2009 6:04 am

Re: Amazing machine work

Post by pete » Sun Dec 15, 2019 3:02 pm

Thanks for the extra history BDD. And I hadn't known that 1913 date was before there start on aircraft engines.

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GlennW
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Re: Amazing machine work

Post by GlennW » Sun Dec 15, 2019 9:26 pm

EOsteam wrote:
Sun Dec 15, 2019 12:27 pm
How many hours do the engines accrue before overhaul? What determines when overhaul is necessary? Also what parts typically require replacement or refurbishment. My aircraft engine is a 6 cylinder horizontally opposed air cooled apparatus and I’m well familiar with its potential failure modes so I’m interested in the Packard/Merlin engines and what wears out and drives the decision to overhaul.
There is no published TBO for the Merlin's used in Fighters, so everything is basically on "condition", which is highly subjective to the "condition" it was in after the last entity deemed it "overhauled" or "airworthy".

I could fill a wheel barrow with documentation published by Rolls-Royce as "repair schemes" for the engines and individual parts, so there isn't a common "failure point".
Glenn

Operating machines is perfectly safe......until you forget how dangerous it really is!

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BigDumbDinosaur
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Location: Midwestern United States

Re: Amazing machine work

Post by BigDumbDinosaur » Mon Dec 16, 2019 1:07 am

pete wrote:
Sun Dec 15, 2019 3:02 pm
Thanks for the extra history BDD. And I hadn't known that 1913 date was before there start on aircraft engines.
Pratt's first engine, the "Wasp," military designation R-1340 (R means radial, 1340 is the engine displacement in cubic inches), came off the drawing board in 1925. Rated takeoff power was 600 HP. Amazingly, that engine was in production for nearly 30 years, and new parts for it are still available. It's a popular engine with crop duster and bush pilots because of its performance and dependability.

The Pratt "Double Wasp" (R-2800) was a direct descendant of the original Wasp. Developing 2400 HP at takeoff, the R-2800 was the engine that powered the P-47 Thunderbolt, F4U Corsair (referred to by Japanese pilots as "whistling death"), B-26 bomber and the Douglas DC-6 airliner. Aviation historians general consider the R-2800 to be the best aero radial ever produced. A fellow I worked with in the 1970s flew Thunderbolts during World War II and said a P-47 pilot's motto when engaging the enemy was "Place your trust in God and Pratt & Whitney"—he understood that motto after having part of a cylinder shot off during a dog fight. As he described it, the engine was smoking and running rough, but he made it back to base. Pratt produced over 125,000 of these engines.

The development of the R-2800 was aided by Pratt's development of a ganged milling saw. Pratt realized that the engine's high (by aero standards) horsepower per cubic inch rating would pose cooling problems at full throttle and that the cylinder heads would need more surface area to radiate heat. So rather than forging the fins as part of the head—the conventional practice at the time, Pratt forged (technically, impact extruded) the head without fins and then used the ganged milling saw to cut the fins out of the solid metal. The saw followed a template so the depth of the fins followed the interior contour of the head to achieve uniformity. The result of this innovation was much closer-spaced and thinner fins, which meant more total fin area.
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I'm an old guy. What's your excuse? ☻

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GlennW
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Re: Amazing machine work

Post by GlennW » Tue Dec 17, 2019 4:27 pm

Moving along...
DSC02206.JPG
Upside down for assembly.
DSC02263.JPG
Glenn

Operating machines is perfectly safe......until you forget how dangerous it really is!

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NP317
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Re: Amazing machine work

Post by NP317 » Tue Dec 17, 2019 10:59 pm

Gives me the chills to see!
RussN

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liveaboard
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Re: Amazing machine work

Post by liveaboard » Fri Dec 20, 2019 6:08 am

I was discussing the definition of art with my neighbor the other day as he helped me with some landscaping;
I said art is art when it evokes emotion in the viewer.
[he's a bit of a motor head]
"Oh, like a Ferrari engine!" he said.

Or that motor Glenn is working on.

RSG
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Re: Amazing machine work

Post by RSG » Fri Dec 20, 2019 8:04 am

I can't get over the amount of bolts! Does every one need to be torqued?
Vision is not seeing things as they are, but as they will be.

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GlennW
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Re: Amazing machine work

Post by GlennW » Fri Dec 20, 2019 4:44 pm

Yessir!

Every threaded item on the engine has a torque value associated with it.
Glenn

Operating machines is perfectly safe......until you forget how dangerous it really is!

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GlennW
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Re: Amazing machine work

Post by GlennW » Fri Dec 20, 2019 4:55 pm

Right now it's a straight six.
DSC02269.jpg
DSC02272.jpg
Glenn

Operating machines is perfectly safe......until you forget how dangerous it really is!

RSG
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Re: Amazing machine work

Post by RSG » Sat Dec 21, 2019 8:10 am

Nuts!

There's no doubt that there is a ton of very detailed machine work involved in a rebuild like this. Must be very satisfying when you complete one!
Vision is not seeing things as they are, but as they will be.

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