Repainting equipment

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neanderman
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Repainting equipment

Post by neanderman » Sun Oct 14, 2018 8:11 pm

I got this interesting link from LeBlond last week. It has some helpful tips on repainting older equipment. Too bad they didn't send this to me before I repainted my Dual Drive! :mrgreen:

http://leblondusa.com/tips-for-repainting-a-lathe/
Ed

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spro
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Re: Repainting equipment

Post by spro » Sun Oct 14, 2018 10:15 pm

Really good recent information. Thanks Ed.

TRX
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Re: Repainting equipment

Post by TRX » Fri Nov 02, 2018 10:05 pm

I bought a Gorton vertical mill from a machine tool dealer. They had prettied it up with a fresh coat of paint. It was cat-vomit-green, with lumps like those textured ceilings that were common in the 1970s.

Shortly after I got it home I went after it with paint stripper, grinding discs, and eventually a needle scaler. The paint was some kind of soft latex that instantly gummed up sanding or grinding discs and was too soft for the scaler to do much. Only stripper did much, and it took a *lot* of it...

I finally gave up with the machine half-piebald, moved it into position, and started using it. But man is it fugly...

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neanderman
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Re: Repainting equipment

Post by neanderman » Fri Nov 02, 2018 10:34 pm

TRX wrote:
Fri Nov 02, 2018 10:05 pm
But man is it fugly...
Nothing wrong with fugly if functional! I painted mine simply because it was just one more step after I'd taken apart everything but the geared head and the apron. No regrets. I used everything from oven cleaner to full strength Spic and Span and Simple Green to get the crud off; didn't need any stripper as I didn't want to take it down to the bare metal, I just wanted to cover where the paint had chipped, so I liberally sanded it, both with a RO and by hand.
Ed

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Glenn Brooks
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Re: Repainting equipment

Post by Glenn Brooks » Fri Nov 02, 2018 11:39 pm

Hey Ed,

That’s a nice article. I love these painting threads because there is always something new coming out regarding cleaners and paint strippers.

One thing I could highly recommend for degreasing, is “Spray n’Wash” laundry cleaner. We spent last winter in Hawaii, volunteering in the back shops at the Hawaiian Railway Society. I discovered quite by accident that Safeway brand “spray n’ wash” laundry spot remover works really well as a degreaser for machine tools. My assignment was to clean up and restore an old 18” Cinninatti lathe. It had machine oil, grime and dirt dried and cacked on from at least 45 years ago, when it was in the old Doyle Pineapple machine shops in Downtown Honolulu.

End of each day my shop clothes would be completely trashed from degreasing thelathe with diesel, solvents, old oil and railroad grime. I couldn’t get them clean. We had some of this Spray and wash stuff in a spray bottle at the place we were renting, so one day I spotted my clothes prior to throwing them into the washing machine. They came out immaculately clean. So I took the bottle into the shops and tried it on the embedded grease on the lathe. The dried oil and grime I couldn’t cut with our industrial solvents just roiled off the machine. Couldn’t believe it.

So now, that’s my go to degreaser for all my cleanup work. Costs something like 3 bucks at the grocery store.

Glenn
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neanderman
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Re: Repainting equipment

Post by neanderman » Sat Nov 03, 2018 12:37 am

Glenn Brooks wrote:
Fri Nov 02, 2018 11:39 pm
One thing I could highly recommend for degreasing, is “Spray n’Wash” laundry cleaner.
Wow! Nice tip! I use "Shout" on my clothes, but never thought of using them on non-fabric items.

I was surprised to find how well the full strength 'liquid' "Spic n Span" cleaned and degreased things. I would soak them in it and then rinse them with clean water and dry them. I saved the used product and, just recently, turned it over to a hazardous waste recovery effort that my county occasionally sponsors.

These products work well and are much more environmentally friendly than things like kerosene, mineral spirits, and acetone. I used some of those in sparing amounts, but felt a lot safer and more responsible using the non-flammable options.
Ed

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Downwindtracker2
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Re: Repainting equipment

Post by Downwindtracker2 » Thu Nov 22, 2018 7:09 pm

At work, the guys from the Arkansas plant recommended Loctite Naturel Blue for a degreaser. So the purchasing agent brought some in. It seemed to work well enough, so of course I brought some home. I gave one to my wife for my jeans. So much for my stash.
A man of foolish pursuits, '91 BusyBee DF1224g lathe,'01 Advance RF-45 mill/drill,'68 Delta Toolmaker surface grinder,Miller250 mig,'83 8" Baldor grinder, plus sawdustmakers

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