Power HACKSAW question

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wally318
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Power HACKSAW question

Post by wally318 » Sun Dec 08, 2019 10:53 pm

Have been entertaining the idea of picking up a small power hacksaw.
I've noticed that some of the smaller 12 inch models had a blade
lift feature and some not. My question is: not having blade lift
does that cause quicker blade wear?

John Hasler
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Re: Power HACKSAW question

Post by John Hasler » Sun Dec 08, 2019 11:11 pm

Yes.

Harold_V
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Re: Power HACKSAW question

Post by Harold_V » Mon Dec 09, 2019 4:45 am

I wouldn't own a power hack saw that didn't lift on the return stroke. If you want to see why, try dragging a new file backwards on a piece of steel. You can also try the same thing with a new hack saw blade. The biggest mistake made with a hack saw is dragging on the return----which promptly removes the keen edge that is necessary for cutting without huge down pressure.

H
Wise people talk because they have something to say. Fools talk because they have to say something.

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SteveM
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Re: Power HACKSAW question

Post by SteveM » Mon Dec 09, 2019 3:49 pm

I had one that didn't lift and I think I spent more time replacing blades than sawing.

Seriously, I think I had to put a new blade on every few cuts.

I have an HF horizontal bandsaw blade and eat will eat a power hacksaw for lunch. I don't see any reason to have a power hacksaw.

Steve

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liveaboard
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Re: Power HACKSAW question

Post by liveaboard » Mon Dec 09, 2019 4:54 pm

SteveM wrote:
Mon Dec 09, 2019 3:49 pm
reason to have a power hacksaw.
Steve
Because you can get them cheap; that's why I bought one.
Blade cost is far higher of course, so it depends how many cuts you make.

A bandsaw would have cost me 4x more than the hacksaw, and was not an option.

John Hasler
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Re: Power HACKSAW question

Post by John Hasler » Mon Dec 09, 2019 5:38 pm

A power hacksaw can have a thick, wide, HSS blade. If the machine is properly made and correctly adjusted this allows it to make very straight cuts.

Russ Hanscom
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Re: Power HACKSAW question

Post by Russ Hanscom » Mon Dec 09, 2019 5:58 pm

Because it is the only saw you have - I got a Marvel 1908 draw cut in 1970 for $35, cleaned it up and made a rolling base and a feed table and it is still working. Not fast, I only use it for heavy stock now, start the cut, and go away until I hear the piece hit the floor. It uses a 1 1/4 x 17" 6 tooth blade and they last long time. It has sawed 8" bar and 9 "round and tons of angle - slowly. Certainly not a modern production tool but since I have several projects going at any time, waiting on a cut is not an issue. I have to admit, that it is moving closer to the door and the next time another nice tool follows me home, it might have to go out.

There is lifting and there is lifting - on the marvel, the blade is not clear of the stock, touches slightly on the return, but does not appear to cause wear.

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liveaboard
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Re: Power HACKSAW question

Post by liveaboard » Mon Dec 09, 2019 6:44 pm

I have a dry saw I use for light stock; angle, tube, and mild steel rod up to 1".
The dry saw is fast. And the blades expensive.
Power hacksaw for bigger stuff, beams + heavier solid rod.
My saw came with a carbide tooth blade, but it was damaged. I've never seen another one anywhere.

Harold_V
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Re: Power HACKSAW question

Post by Harold_V » Tue Dec 10, 2019 1:20 am

What Russ Hanscom said.
The outfit that used to sell tool steels in Salt Lake City (when I was actively running my shop) used only a power hack saw, and for that exact reason. What they couldn't afford to do was to cut large diameter tool steel at an angle, rendering a huge amount of stock useless. Their cuts were dead straight--and didn't take all that long, either. Of course, the saw they used was huge (and fully lifted the blade on the back stroke).

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Wise people talk because they have something to say. Fools talk because they have to say something.

armscor 1
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Re: Power HACKSAW question

Post by armscor 1 » Tue Dec 10, 2019 4:09 pm

I have a 14" power hacksaw that lifts on the return stroke and would not be without it, Eclipse blades are cheap and easy to replace and cut straight.
Having owned a bandsaw, yes cuts more quickly but I am just a home shop hobbiest, not doing production work and I set the work to be cut and walk away and do something else while the machine does it's work.
Simple machine, a few drops of oil and will go all day.
No guide bearings, tracking adjustments, or pulleys to wear out.

wally318
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Re: Power HACKSAW question

Post by wally318 » Tue Dec 17, 2019 3:37 pm

Thanks for all the input.
In the reading/research I've been doing, I've read some post
saying a power hacksaw can cut harder materials than a bandsaw.
eg.railroad ties. Any input on this.

Russ Hanscom
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Re: Power HACKSAW question

Post by Russ Hanscom » Tue Dec 17, 2019 3:43 pm

Guessing that you mean RR track and not ties!.

I think it depends mostly on blade quality and not the saw type, assuming both are set up properly. Most of the RR track I have encountered has not been that hard to saw; I understand it can tough or hard.

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