Winding springs

All discussion about lathes including but not limited to: South Bend, Hardinge, Logan, Monarch, Clausing and other HSM lathes, including imports

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liveaboard
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Re: Winding springs

Post by liveaboard » Wed Nov 06, 2019 7:17 am

Amazing the tube didn't kink or flatten out without side support during bending.

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PhooBar
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Re: Winding springs

Post by PhooBar » Wed Nov 06, 2019 10:34 am

"When back on days Senior management wanted to know how it was done, my secret."

The answer to this question should always be, "Standard machinist's practice."
Magicians never explain their tricks.
Captain of the 1984 Olympic Dumpster Diving Team.

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Re: Winding springs

Post by Harold_V » Wed Nov 06, 2019 4:19 pm

PhooBar wrote:
Wed Nov 06, 2019 10:34 am
"When back on days Senior management wanted to know how it was done, my secret."

The answer to this question should always be, "Standard machinist's practice."
Magicians never explain their tricks.
Depends on the machinist, doesn't it?
I can't recall a time when I wouldn't share the knowledge and experience I have in regards to machining, secure in the belief that just because I possess the required skill to execute a given difficult operation means that my disclosure of the procedure will allow others to duplicate my performance. Considering the fact that I was trained on the job, had I worked for a firm that held that thought, I hesitate to think how I'd have turned out.

By the way, amongst the numbers who taught us, there was one supervisor who held just such a belief, which he shared readily (if I teach you everything I know, you'll have my job). In his case, I'm grateful, for I aspired to achieve a far greater level of competence than he displayed. I still shudder when I recall the day he used a Deltronic pin to lap a hole, and I still thank him for not sharing his "knowledge" (the term used loosely) with me.

H
Wise people talk because they have something to say. Fools talk because they have to say something.

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liveaboard
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Re: Winding springs

Post by liveaboard » Thu Nov 07, 2019 1:19 pm

I used to live in India; the culture there is everything is a secret.
A machinist I knew used to only do some jobs at night with the shutter rolled down so no one would see how he did it.
Even housewives have secret recipes that they only pass on to their daughters on their deathbeds.

On the other end of that, everyone is trying to steal the info and copy it all the time. Kids hired as helpers set themselves up as professionals after a few months, calling themselves plumbers, electricians, and machinists. Then they hire kids to help them and the cycle repeats, until no one has any idea how things should be done.
There are trade schools, and they turn out proficient people. But they're swamped by pretenders.
Of course now they all have access to the internet, and forums like this. I wonder if things have improved much?

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Re: Winding springs

Post by Harold_V » Thu Nov 07, 2019 7:09 pm

liveaboard wrote:
Thu Nov 07, 2019 1:19 pm
I used to live in India; the culture there is everything is a secret.
A machinist I knew used to only do some jobs at night with the shutter rolled down so no one would see how he did it.
The only time I've kept my cards close to my vest was when I was refining precious metals. In that instance, one's skills play less of a role than they do in other trades, machining being one of them. Even more so, welding and precision sheet metal work, where hand skills are everything.

One of my favorite sayings in regards to refining precious metals is that a monkey could be taught to run the process. It's relatively simple, assuming one understands what is happening, and why. Skill plays almost no role. What kept the population from refining precious metals was federal law, and the relatively scarce availability of instructional material. Once learned, it's dead easy. As it was my source of income, I didn't welcome competition.

As far as machining goes, I was gifted with the ability, although it needed development. Not all are so fortunate, but most likely have a gift I adore, and do not have. As an example, I love music, but I am not able to MAKE music (yes, I've tried). A good musician need not fear showing me his/her skills----they wouldn't be lost to me, just as my skills on a machine would not be lost to others when shared.

An observation I made when I worked in a shop with many machinists. About one in ten has exceptional skill, and tend to do not only good work, but do it quickly and reliably. Another two are quite good, but prone to making occasional mistakes. The balance of them would most likely be better suited to other work. In fact, one guy I used to work with hated machining. He (Ron Kosec) became a mortician and was totally satisfied with his second career.

H
Wise people talk because they have something to say. Fools talk because they have to say something.

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