My 12" 4 jaw has gained weight.

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liveaboard
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Re: My 12" 4 jaw has gained weight.

Post by liveaboard » Mon Dec 09, 2019 1:18 pm

I have a 3-phase 1 ton chain hoist in my garage. I use it to lift up my car[s] one end at a time.
disassembling my big tractor was a breeze. I even use it for the tires of the tractor as they weigh 1/2 ton each [water filled].
clk hoist.jpg
tractor wheel lift tool.jpg
Everyone should have a hoist.
Or several.

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BadDog
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Re: My 12" 4 jaw has gained weight.

Post by BadDog » Mon Dec 09, 2019 1:31 pm

I've got a "sky hook" for just such issues, but find it's usually more hassle than value for anything less than the big 15". I have a D1-6, and my best solution to date for the 12" HD 4 jaw is a stack of 2x4 drops.

For all my medium sized chucks (8" to 12", already mounted), I cut a 2x4 just wider than the bed, and then a notch to align on the front v-way. Then, as needed, stacked other boards (secured with glue and screws) on that one to get close to the bottom of the chuck. The final step was to take miter cut 2x4 drops (maybe 4" long or so) and slide the wedge up to make contact with the chuck OD, and likewise secured those.

Now I can just crack the cam locks, just slike it out while keeping it balanced on the fitted base. Once clear, I can just do a sort of diagonal deadlift off the bed, walk to the tail of the bed, and set it there. Pick up the next chuck from the same region, and walk it to the spindle. Set the support (keeping the chuck balanced) on the bed, and slide it into the spindle, secure cam locks.

If you don't have a 60" bed you almost never need all of, substitute some other storage location at a suitable height.

The only suggestion I would make for improvement is to use a 2x6 at least on the bottom for stability. Other than larger 3 jaws, chucks generally aren't over 4" thick, so not much point in being wider at contact point (other than exceptions).

Of course that's only going to work well for D, A, or L series spindles. With a threaded spindle I would think the hot ticket would be some sort of hoist arrangement (overhead, skyhook, etc) with a "C" shaped hook and rotating (plain bearing) lower bar so that the chuck can be tightened onto it (roughly) centered, and then spun off/on.
Russ
Master Floor Sweeper

AllenH59
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Re: My 12" 4 jaw has gained weight.

Post by AllenH59 » Mon Dec 09, 2019 3:38 pm

Lots of good ideas... I will put a 4x4 through the trusses and hang a block and tackle from it.

whateg0
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Re: My 12" 4 jaw has gained weight.

Post by whateg0 » Tue Jan 14, 2020 1:28 pm

Up until I got my 10EE, I didn't think much of lifting stuff on and off of the lathe. The first time I lifted that 10EE TS onto the bed, I decided I need a hoist of some sort before I ever move it on or off of the machine again. So far it hasn't left the bed, but I almost needed to recently. That hoist has moved back up "the list". I've hurt my back a couple times now, besides the general stood-hunched-over-the-machine-for-too-long-today stuff. Last time was picking up one of my little 100A Lincoln MIG welders. Just got it off the ground and felt something in my back move. I was down for most of a week from that. I consciously try not to lift anything over about 40# if I can avoid it.

Dave

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liveaboard
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Re: My 12" 4 jaw has gained weight.

Post by liveaboard » Tue Jan 14, 2020 6:38 pm

Just say NO to heavy lifting.
It's just not worth it!
If only I would remember these words, pain time could be significantly reduced.

spro
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Re: My 12" 4 jaw has gained weight.

Post by spro » Wed Jan 15, 2020 12:07 am

The paradox is that we need these things when we may be too busted up to do them.

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NP317
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Re: My 12" 4 jaw has gained weight.

Post by NP317 » Wed Jan 15, 2020 2:59 am

spro wrote:
Wed Jan 15, 2020 12:07 am
The paradox is that we need these things when we may be too busted up to do them.
Never be afraid to ask for help.
RN

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Re: My 12" 4 jaw has gained weight.

Post by liveaboard » Wed Jan 15, 2020 4:17 am

That's what this whole thread is about; build your lifting setups now, while you can.
A sort of machinists / mechanic's retirement scheme, you invest some of the power you still have to provide you with power later, when it's likely you'll have a shortage of it.

spro
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Re: My 12" 4 jaw has gained weight.

Post by spro » Wed Jan 15, 2020 9:21 pm

Sometimes when I walk into my garage, I'm fairly amazed. Who ran all those electrical feeds. Who re enforced the rafters so a two post car lift could be there. Who assembled all these things and not a picture to prove it. It was me, 30+ years ago. I dare not get on 12' ladders anymore and likely impaled if I fell. That's nothing. People die by shoveling snow, really great people who overextended their heart. It was so natural to do this as the year before but it "popped" and laying in the snow, it takes time to find you.
Sometimes people take a drink too much, trying to wipe away the memories of past friends and neighbors.

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