New-to-Me Logan 400

All discussion about lathes including but not limited to: South Bend, Hardinge, Logan, Monarch, Clausing and other HSM lathes, including imports

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hoyt
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Joined: Sat Dec 29, 2018 1:20 pm

New-to-Me Logan 400

Post by hoyt » Sat Dec 29, 2018 6:52 pm

I'm retired and have a one-man hotrod shop in the back of a commercial build I own. Last summer, I thought it would be a good idea to learn how to use a lathe, there being so many handy things you can do with one. So this past October, I purchased a 1949 Logan Model 400 (9"x18") from a local estate. It started life at an air-compressor manufacturer in Pittsburgh, so it needed some repair and I have just finished the work on it. I had signed up for a class at the local community college, but that was was 3-semester program geared towards turning out "certified" candidates for local industry. That wasn't really suited to me and I had some short-term health issues that would have forced me to miss about half of the semester, so I dropped out, got some books and watched some YouTube Videos. Along the way, I acquired a second Logan 400 that is missing a few small parts but came with some nice-to-have accessories.

Yesterday, I made chips for the first time. With a little practice and some small adjustments to the lathe, I will now be able to make the parts I need for the second lathe and continue improving my skills.
2018-12-28 14.51.16.jpg
2018-12-28 15.02.59.jpg

spro
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Re: New-to-Me Logan 400

Post by spro » Sat Dec 29, 2018 9:22 pm

Well that is cool and a nice clean smaller lathe. The method of cutting is wrong with that type tool post. There are other ways to turn without the tool defaulting to dig into the cut. Since you don't have a QCGB The saddle can wrap around the headstock more closer and tool holder designed to fall back. There's lots of stuff that can be done with the lantern style but you have to know which toolholder and which type cutting tool to insert. When ground correctly, they are wonderful.

John Hasler
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Location: Elmwood, Wisconsin

Re: New-to-Me Logan 400

Post by John Hasler » Sat Dec 29, 2018 9:41 pm

A four-way square toolpost is a simple alternative to the fancy quick-change type and is much more rigid that the lantern design. They are easy to make.

https://books.google.com/books?id=eMCfb ... hDoAQgXMAA

Conrad_R_Hoffman
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Location: Canandaigua, NY
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Re: New-to-Me Logan 400

Post by Conrad_R_Hoffman » Thu Jan 24, 2019 4:08 pm

Great looking Logan!
Conrad

1947 Logan 211 Lathe, Grizzly G1006 mill/drill, Clausing DP,
Boyar-Schultz 612H surface grinder, Sunnen hone, import
bandsaw, lots of measurement stuff, cutters, clutter & stuff.


"May the root sum of the squares of the Forces be with you."

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rudd
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Joined: Wed Dec 12, 2007 11:21 pm
Location: savannah ga.

Re: New-to-Me Logan 400

Post by rudd » Thu Jan 24, 2019 7:27 pm

I'm in the "fancy Quick Change" camp. The savings of time while working is great. I grab a turning tool, put it on, it is on center. Need to face something? Change blocks, it's on center. Threading? Parting? Just put the block on the tool post and it is centered up ready to go.
I snagged a Dorian off E-bay, then bought additional tool holders (blocks). If you get one, get a wedge type, not a piston. Usually not any cost difference. Wedge is a better design.
The quick change made the lathe fun again.

Conrad_R_Hoffman
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Re: New-to-Me Logan 400

Post by Conrad_R_Hoffman » Fri Jan 25, 2019 8:25 am

I hate 4-bangers and only use the QC. Get the wedge type and get a bunch of cheap holders from CDCO. Get a box of new dog point screws and replace the ones that come with the holders. Set 'em up for the tools you need and go to town.
Conrad

1947 Logan 211 Lathe, Grizzly G1006 mill/drill, Clausing DP,
Boyar-Schultz 612H surface grinder, Sunnen hone, import
bandsaw, lots of measurement stuff, cutters, clutter & stuff.


"May the root sum of the squares of the Forces be with you."

earlgo
Posts: 1441
Joined: Sat Jan 29, 2011 11:38 am
Location: NE Ohio

Re: New-to-Me Logan 400

Post by earlgo » Fri Jan 25, 2019 10:23 am

Being impecunious, I don't have a QC toolpost for my 12: Atlas so I built an intermediate between the lantern style Armstrong holder and the QC type. It has worked very well for me. It looks like this:
ToolPost dwg.jpg
Tool Post
There is a full set of drawings if anyone is interested. Just PM me for a set in .pdf format. If your lathe is less than a 12" then some dimensions would need to change, but the concept would be ok. This holds 5/16 square tool bits. Here it is in use for threading on the other side, ie from the headstock out.
reverse threading.JPG
Reverse threading
--earlgo
Before you do anything, you must do something else first. - Washington's principle.

spro
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Location: mid atlantic

Re: New-to-Me Logan 400

Post by spro » Fri Jan 25, 2019 1:46 pm

Very nice and rigid with good clearance. Big "Like".

Harold_V
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Re: New-to-Me Logan 400

Post by Harold_V » Sat Jan 26, 2019 2:44 am

earlgo wrote:
Fri Jan 25, 2019 10:23 am
It looks like this:
I couldn't help but notice the compound set on the proper side for threading towards the tailstock with the tool at the rear. Well done!

Nice looking holder, by the way.

I specialized in small work when my shop was in operation. For the size work I did, I preferred an indexing toolpost instead of a quick change. I used one made by O.K. Rubber Welders (really!), and really liked it. Still have it, in fact. I can index and be cutting faster than a guy can remove one for a quick change. It has its limits, though. You're limited to four positions, so unless you can use tools for multiple purposes, it can be difficult to make a functional setup for a complex part.

H
Wise people talk because they have something to say. Fools talk because they have to say something.

John Hasler
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Joined: Tue Dec 06, 2016 4:05 pm
Location: Elmwood, Wisconsin

Re: New-to-Me Logan 400

Post by John Hasler » Sat Jan 26, 2019 9:42 am

My plan (which I have only partially implemented) is have multiple indexed 4-way holders so that I can quickly swap out the one I'm using for the one with the tool I need on it and rely on the indexing to repeat the position. This will require that the T-nut be lockable independently from the holder and that the indexing mechanism be in the base so that the holders themselves will be simple enough to easly make several. The tools will have to be shimmed but it will only have to be done at most after each resharpening.

I might go to a two-way design.

Harold_V
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Re: New-to-Me Logan 400

Post by Harold_V » Sat Jan 26, 2019 4:59 pm

Your plan would work quite nicely with the OK Rubber Welder type head, assuming you could find multiples. The T holder is restrained by a pair of socket head cap screws, this the base is independent of the tool block. However, the advantage of using that concept would be lost to some degree, as changing the block involves a little more effort than just indexing, which is extremely rapid and precise.

H
Wise people talk because they have something to say. Fools talk because they have to say something.

John Hasler
Posts: 1271
Joined: Tue Dec 06, 2016 4:05 pm
Location: Elmwood, Wisconsin

Re: New-to-Me Logan 400

Post by John Hasler » Sat Jan 26, 2019 7:46 pm

The goal is to have the best of both worlds: be able to index to any of four tools mounted in the block, and quickly swap the block for a different one when none of those tools will do. The indexing should allow the new block to be positioned precisely as the old one was.

For this to work I need to design the blocks to be very simple. Otherwise I'll never get around to making more than one.

Found these pictures of the OK Rubber toolpost:

https://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/g ... me-249071/

Similar to what I have in mind though I don't think I need 120 positions: I'll just use a ball detent with perhaps 16. I do need a quick change mechanism for locking down the block such as interrupted theads.

I'll post photos if I ever get it finished. Right now it's +5F in the shop and scheduled to get really cold.

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