older milling machines

Discussion on all milling machines vertical & horizontal, including but not limited to Bridgeports, Hardinge, South Bend, Clausing, Van Norman, including imports.

Moderators: Harold_V, GlennW

Post Reply
spro
Posts: 7801
Joined: Mon Feb 20, 2006 11:04 pm
Location: mid atlantic

older milling machines

Post by spro » Sat Jan 11, 2020 8:59 am

From overhead line shaft drive, the bearings can't take tension from below. There is so much weight in the spindle assembly, it can't ride that way. Delicate engineering to pull from the top, balancing the weight. So we have overhead motors for those. The solid round arm /OA was calculated to be sound for the operations. The round ram of a Hendey Norton #1 1/2 universal is 3 1/2" OD as was the Brown & Sharpe #2 universal. It was all different very quickly around those times. Were it not for milling machines as these and these were small ones,

RONALD
Posts: 578
Joined: Sun Oct 26, 2003 7:27 am

Re: older milling machines

Post by RONALD » Sat Jan 11, 2020 1:41 pm

Spro, I have two older B&S Mills, a 1908 #1-1/2, and a 1924 #1 they were both installed at the older school building where all shops had line shafts powered by one single electric motor near each shop. When they were transferred to the new school building, in the middle 1930's, electrical distribution had so improved that the whole school school had 3 Phase 220 volts available in all 54 shops.

All the many mills that were trucked over to the new school building were equipped with Cullman Wheel Company Overhead Drives, which was the way conversion was being done in those years for most line shaft machines.

These mills were used in the various machine shops until all shops were put out of business ending in the last closing (Auto) in 2012. They now rely solely STEM Machines in STEM Classes, which are toys!

Anyway, I did not have a Phase Converter at the time I acquired #1-1/2 so I thru away the 1930's 3 Ph and substituted a 2HP 1 Ph on the Cullman Drive.

For the #1, I thru away the Cullman Drive (I'm sorry - I buried it in the RR Rite-of-Way) and substituted an old DoAll variable speed drive I had scrapped out of a DC Generator Tester from Sun Inc.

The photos below show those two mills as they are now. The #1 is used exclusively with the H-1 Vertical Head, the #1-1/2 is used both ways.

Not shown is the 1950's B&S #2, for which by then I had acquired a rotary phase converter: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C-sfBZWdyPA
DSCN1944_2.jpg
DSCN1962.JPG
DSCN6383.JPG
DSCN6385.JPG

User avatar
GlennW
Posts: 6812
Joined: Sun Apr 15, 2007 9:23 am
Location: Florida

Re: older milling machines

Post by GlennW » Sat Jan 11, 2020 4:41 pm

I used to occasionally tinker with a lathe with a Cullman drive on it. I have some pics here somewhere...

These old Dinosaurs are fun to use.
Glenn

Operating machines is perfectly safe......until you forget how dangerous it really is!

spro
Posts: 7801
Joined: Mon Feb 20, 2006 11:04 pm
Location: mid atlantic

Re: older milling machines

Post by spro » Sat Jan 11, 2020 9:46 pm

B & S. No. 10 is the spindle taper of all these but the spindle nose changed. My Hendey Norton has threaded spindle 4 TPI L. H. ( I thought that the universal dividing head shared the chuck but I believe it was a collar to retain the original arbors beyond what the drawbar could do.) A friend's Brown & Sharpe #2 universal has a tapered spindle, looking like a cone, with slots in the face. The milling arbor relied on those arbor keys to prevent the arbor taper spinning inside the spindle. So they were getting really close to compound tapers. The "cone" looked like an L 0 taper which is retained by one key and lock ring - but it was before that. It is all interesting and I really appreciate your pictures. Nice mills for sure.

spro
Posts: 7801
Joined: Mon Feb 20, 2006 11:04 pm
Location: mid atlantic

Re: older milling machines

Post by spro » Mon Jan 13, 2020 9:39 pm

Hi Glenn. I would like to see those pictures. If for no other reason, it keeps this thread alive. There were different original vertical heads that fit these mills. Some driven by a long slotted arbor and supported by the over arm. They could move forward back in Y direction. The heavier ones clamped to the face dovetails and really committed to vertical milling. They were B &S #9 or #10 at the head ( on stuff I saw). Right large fly heads and face mills on these. Still, they took out the ability to quickly go horizontal. The independent motor heads which clamped to the OA can be swung away for horizontal milling. Some of the head attachments have bores of 5 1/4", 4 1/2" . And that isn't even "J" heads. The tech was moving high speed and the base could support it.

Post Reply