Economy Box 'n Reef

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ccvstmr
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Re: Economy Box 'n Reef

Post by ccvstmr » Thu Jun 17, 2021 8:38 am

BigDumbDinosaur wrote:
Thu Jun 17, 2021 1:28 am
ccvstmr wrote:
Tue Jun 15, 2021 8:43 pm
And when the ice hatch covers were "buttoned up" (or down), here's what the end result looked like.
That paint looks "factory." Wish I could paint like that using nothing more that a spray can. :cry:
Appreciate the "factory fresh" paint comment. I could say...it's all in the wrist (just kidding). Firmly believe it all starts with good surface preparation and cleaning. Will add (my opin)...the satin coatings are little more forgiving than gloss coatings. Most of us (myself included) are not patient enough to apply several light coats. If you can't get the paint droplets to bridge...you end up with a "fuzzy" paint job. There's no way to explain the process other than good lighting, watch the surface light reflection as you move along. Apply/spray paint along the previous "wet edge".

When I get to the box 'n reefer painting...ran into a problem myself. Had to step back and correct that before moving ahead. What can you say other than...it happens. I've heard other says....anybody amateur can slap on paint...but it takes a pro to correct mistakes and look like nothing ever happened. Not sure I'm at that "pro" level yet. Thanks for the post. Carl B.
Life is like a sewer...what you get out of it depends on what you put into it!
I don't walk on water...I just learned where some of the stepping stones are!
I love mankind...it's some of the people I can't stand!

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ccvstmr
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Re: Economy Box 'n Reef

Post by ccvstmr » Fri Jun 18, 2021 9:01 am

SPLASH OF COLOR - PART 1-1

Okay guys, we're nearing the end. The car bodies and roofs have been completed. Time for some paint. After which, there's graphics and final assembly or attachment of the various details.

Will start by describing the reefer paint job. The Northern Pacific reefer cars were basically two colors. The closest rattle can match I came up with was Rustoleum gloss marigold for the sides. Rustoleum flat red primer spray used for the roof would also be used for the car ends. The red primer would eventually be over sprayed with a Minwax clear satin polyurethane. Oh yeah, the underside of the car was painted with Rustoleum satin canyon black.

Once I decided to finish the reefer in NP colors and graphics, here's what I was aiming for. This is one of my old Athearn HO NP reefer models with the "Main Street of the Northwest" slogan. Liked the way the script slogan offset the rail roman font on the rest of the car.

IMG_1925.jpg

As I've advocated many times before, I try to sand blast or glass bead blast all metal surfaces before painting. This roughs up the surface (glass bean blasting is more of a burnishing) so the paint has something it can get a grip on. Or as sometimes noted...more "bite".

Years ago my friend...okay, let's call him Chris ('cause that's what his name is...he's also the guy building the 2.5" scale logging disconnects in the other Chaski forum)...made his portable sand blast pot "mobile". Chris likes to economize and improve efficiency wherever he can. I always hope that would translate back to his train building. Sometimes I can nudge him in that direction...other times not. To each his own.

To make the sand blast pot mobile, Chris got a 2-wheeled cart from Harbor freight. Mounted the pot to the cat. Took an empty 20# propane bottle, removed the valve, used a hole saw to make the largest possible hole inside the bottom foot ring with a hole saw. A couple pipe nipples and a ball valve were inserted between the pot and tank...and now there's a sand "hopper" right no top of the pot. House air is piped in, obviously to move the sand that drops out the bottom of the pot, but also apply some downward pressure on the sand in the pot. A valve on the bottom allows control of the sand flow. Another valve controls air flow for blasting. And there's one last valve...the bleed valve. When it's time to refill the pot...turn off the air to the pot and relieve the pressure in the pot BEFORE opening the sand valve under the hopper (don't ask how I know). Here's what this contraption looks like.

Should note, the spray hose and nozzle are industrial grade. Any kind of sand media will have a habit of wearing the blast nozzle as well as the nozzle stopper. Will add...we wear a blasting hood while cleaning metals that has compressed air pumped in for breathing and to try and blow out any air born sand. It's almost like a Darth Vader hoody. For this kind of metal preparation, we use white silica sand available from Menards. For small blasting jobs like the box and reefer, waste sand is allows to fall on the gravel driveway...never to be seen again. Here's the blaster...

IMG_4570.JPG

Let's get masking. Had all kinds of tape, card board and newspaper ready for masking depending on the application. As mentioned, the underside of the car would be painted satin black. So, started with the car upside down on a cart. The bottom of the car had already been painted black early on during car construction, but that was before the bottom aluminum edge trim was installed.

Masked the center sill area. Used duct tape along the perimeter. Have found duct tape can withstand the sand blasting abuse. Then used regular blur or green masking tape to hold the cardboard in place. Anything else that needed protection was covered over as well.

IMG_4565.JPG

However, the reefer still wasn't ready for blasting. Knew from the start it would probably be a bad idea to sand blast the aluminum flashing sheets used for the sides of the car body. Nothing more than contact cement was holding the flashing in place. Did NOT want to risk bubbling or blistering the this aluminum. So the car sides were masked as well (took longer to do all the masking than the blasting!). Went around the perimeter of the flashing edges with duct tape. Then, used cardboard to fill in the open areas. With the car body up on wood blocks, could also squat down to blast (upside down) the upper edge car side wall edge trim.

IMG_4564.JPG

Here's how the aluminum trim and duck tape masking looked after blasting. The aluminum trim and escutcheon pin heads or drive screw heads used for edging were nicely roughened. Figured the rough aluminum trim pieces would be filled in with the paint (and it was)...the same for the aluminum dreadnaught castings. Can see how the duct tape around the car side perimeter was "abused". But the duct tape held strong. When the masking was removed, cleaning the adhesive residue would be another matter.

IMG_4573.JPG

With all the masking still in place, an air blast nozzle was used to blow away any sand/powder left on the car surfaces. The roughened aluminum trim and castings...was better to use a stiff haired paint brush to clean off any residue. DO NOT use a shop towel or rag...as the lint or fuzz will get grabbed by the rough surface. That, or after the rag/towels...go over the surface with the brush.

At this point, finished spraying the black on the car underside. Sprayed the car ends with red primer. Wasn't too concerned if there was red primer over spray on the car bottom...but didn't want black over spray on the car ends. Was a good plan, but still had to come back later to mask the car sides and hit the ends again with red primer.

IMG_4574.JPG

Next time, we'll get some color on the car sides. Stick around...there's more masking heading our way! Carl B.
Life is like a sewer...what you get out of it depends on what you put into it!
I don't walk on water...I just learned where some of the stepping stones are!
I love mankind...it's some of the people I can't stand!

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ccvstmr
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Re: Economy Box 'n Reef

Post by ccvstmr » Sun Jun 20, 2021 7:37 am

SPLASH OF COLOR - PART 1-2

Continuing with the reefer, the car ends and underside were already painted. Was time to address the car sides. Was also time to remove all the masking on the car sides exposing the aluminum flashing...and now mask the ends and underside of the car. The back and forth masking would continue until all the surfaces received their final finish.

IMG_4578.JPG

Prior to starting the paint finish work, jumped on YouTube to see if there were any ideas "out there" for painting aluminum. Found a vid of some guy that wanted to repaint aluminum soffit louvers for his house. He used a Rustoleum aluminum primer product. Was I able to locate a couple cans of this primer at Menards.

The can reads...dries in 15-30 minutes...to touch in 1 hour...based on 50 to 90 deg temps, outside for best ventilation, yada, yada, yada. Called the Rustoelum 1-800 number on the can to discuss my application. After all, this is what those people are there for...it's called customer assistance. They noted...I could top coat within an hour after 2 light primer coats.

IMG_4755.JPG

Before that, had to prepare the surface. Instead of sand blasting the aluminum flashing, decided I'd "rough up" the surface using Scotch Brite pads...and a little elbow grease. Okay, scratch that (no pun intended)...a LOT OF ELBOW GREASE! Made sure the the aluminum flashing surface and all the edges/corners were adequately rubbed. Then, the cleaning. Started with a solvent wipe down and finished with wiping the surface with a 99% alcohol wipe down.

IMG_4577.JPG

After a few minutes to allow the alcohol to evaporate, think I took a clean 3" paint brush to "dry brush" the surface to remove any wiping towel lint. And then it was "do or die" moment to see how this priming/painting process was going to work. The car ends and bottom were masked. And then, 2 coats of aluminum primer were applied. Basically had something that resembled a snowball on wheels...

IMG_4586.JPG

Some 30 minutes after the primer was sprayed, I was out shaking the Rustoleum Old Caterpillar Yellow rattle cans. Once again, trying to control myself and NOT apply too much paint at any one time...would follow the "wet paint line" across the car sides as paint was applied. First coat was applied in a left to right pattern. The second coat applied in an up/down pattern to follow the natural lines of the aluminum siding pieces.

When the painting process was completed...had something resembling a reefer.

IMG_4591.JPG

Realized after the end masking was removed, would have to go back when the paint was dry and mask the sides (again) to touch up the aluminum end casting edges (arghhhh!).

IMG_4593.JPG

After the end casting edges were touched up, the reefer painted was completed. The car was set aside for some 48 hours to let the paint dry and harden. Wasn't going to think about applying any graphics until those painted surfaces were ready.

Well you might think I'd show you the graphics application next...but not just yet. Next time, will jump over to the box car to show how the painting progressed there. Will be back soon enough. Carl B.
Life is like a sewer...what you get out of it depends on what you put into it!
I don't walk on water...I just learned where some of the stepping stones are!
I love mankind...it's some of the people I can't stand!

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ccvstmr
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Re: Economy Box 'n Reef

Post by ccvstmr » Mon Jun 21, 2021 8:49 am

SPLASH OF COLOR - PART 2-1

The reefer was set aside to let the paint dry and harden for a couple days before I would even consider starting the graphics application. Got the box car up on a stand outside the shop to go thru the painting process again and beginning with sand blasting the aluminum castings and edge trim.

Before we get started on the paint finishing, here's a Rutland HO scale car for reference. Also have a G scale car...some of you might have seen that sitting on the basement side bench.

IMG_1926.jpg

Will recap only a few parts of the preparation and painting process for the box car which were similar to the reefer. Masking the car sides began by applying a single strip of duct tape around the perimeter of the sides adjacent to the aluminum edge trim and/or cast aluminum door. From there, the US post office was kind enough to provide some priority card board to cover the rest of the exposed side areas.

IMG_4576.JPG

When the sand blasting was completed and as long as the car sides were still masked, the cast aluminum dreadnaught ends and car underside were painted with Rustoelum satin canyon black spray. When the black paint was dry to the touch (in about 30 minutes), all the masking was removed from the car. Used any one of a number of solvents to remove the duct tape adhesive residue that might have been left on the car sides as a result of the sand blasting. Started by using Goof Off, moving up to Acetone and Xylene and eventually, going all out and using some methyl ethyl ketone (MEK).

IMG_4581.JPG

After the adhesive residue was removed, was now time to turn the car right-side up on the train cart. The car ends were masked off. Out came the Scotch Bright pads. The aluminum flashing on the car sides received a good rub down making sure that all the tight corners along the corner trim were adequately rubbed and roughed up as well as possible.

IMG_4597.JPG

After a thorough cleaning...the last of which was with some 99% solvent followed by a brush off with a new, clean paint brush to remove any cleaning towel lint or fuzz. Then, out came the yellow spray paint. Didn't have to paint the lower portion of the two sides...since that would eventually get painted green. The car was set aside to let the yellow paint dry and harden before masking the yellow portion of the car sides to apply the next paint color.

IMG_4602.JPG

However, when the masking tape was removed after the green paint application, found out the masking tap (bot green or blue) do NOT leave a nice, crisp, clean lines. If that wasn't bad enough, removing the masking tape pulled some of the freshly painted green paint from the yellow car surface (to the left end of the car in the next photo. Arghhhh!

IMG_4605.JPG

Sadly, that wasn't the worse of the problems encountered. Will get into some of the other "issues" next time. Carl B.
Life is like a sewer...what you get out of it depends on what you put into it!
I don't walk on water...I just learned where some of the stepping stones are!
I love mankind...it's some of the people I can't stand!

Harold_V
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Re: Economy Box 'n Reef

Post by Harold_V » Mon Jun 21, 2021 2:56 pm

I read, with great interest, your experiences with duct tape. There's an alternate that is far better, and eliminates the adhesive removal process.

There is a tape on the market that is red in color, and it resembles electrical tape, although it's 2" wide. It's used by the folks who plaster. I learned about it when our shop was finished with Plako, a synthetic plaster (same as dryvit).

It can be procured from The Home Depot, but be cautious when ordering, as they also offer red duct tape. Make sure the tape is intended for use in plastering, and is vinyl, not fabric. It leaves no residue behind, and resists sand blasting much better.

Note that I am not promoting The Home Depot. The tape may be procured from other sources. It just happens that the Depot is the only one I know of in my area.

H
Wise people talk because they have something to say. Fools talk because they have to say something.

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ccvstmr
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Re: Economy Box 'n Reef

Post by ccvstmr » Tue Jun 22, 2021 8:07 am

Harold_V wrote:
Mon Jun 21, 2021 2:56 pm
I read, with great interest, your experiences with duct tape. There's an alternate that is far better, and eliminates the adhesive removal process.

There is a tape on the market that is red in color, and it resembles electrical tape, although it's 2" wide. It's used by the folks who plaster. I learned about it when our shop was finished with Plako, a synthetic plaster (same as dryvit).
H
Harold...thanks for that little nugget of info. Actually, I AM familiar with that tape. At the shop where the box 'n reef painting were taking place (along with other model work I get involved in), the shop owner has some of that red tape. He got his supply from a contractor when he was doing electrical contractor work.

We use that tape to hold the edges of 8.5 x 11 transparency film to the inside of the sand blast cabinet glass. The transparency film is sacrificial and needs to be replaced periodically, but that beats replacing the glass. The tape remains intact until we can't see thru the plastic film.

In that application, the blasting media was not pointed at the tape...so direct impingement was avoided. Don't know how the tape would tolerate that kind of abuse. Might have to run an experiment the next time I'm over at that shop. Good tip, trick and technique to know about. Thx. Carl B.
Life is like a sewer...what you get out of it depends on what you put into it!
I don't walk on water...I just learned where some of the stepping stones are!
I love mankind...it's some of the people I can't stand!

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ccvstmr
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Re: Economy Box 'n Reef

Post by ccvstmr » Tue Jun 22, 2021 8:44 am

SPLASH OF COLOR - PART 2-2

At the end of the last post, described some peeling along the green/yellow paint split. If ONLY that were the worst of the problems. Most other physical construction/fabrication matters can be corrected and covered over with little notice thereafter. Not so with the paint finish as EVERYBODY will see that! As my luck would have it, things were about to get..."interesting".

Walked around to the other side of the box car and saw this...

IMG_4619.JPG

OH CARP! WRINKLED PAINT! How did that happen? Was that the result of insufficient drying of the yellow paint underneath? Was that the result of applying the green paint too heavy? Did it matter? HECK NO! Had to figure out a way to correct and move on.

Figured I let the paint finish "dry" another day before going over the wrinkled area with some 120 grit sandpaper and a sanding block. Masked off the area using the aluminum trim edges, a flashing piece edge and the yellow/green paint break. Did my best to feather the edges of the now (3) layers of primer and paint.

IMG_4620.JPG

Don't think I mentioned, this "green" was Rustoleum gloss Hunter Green. So the wrinkled area was corrected and when dry enough, masked over as I saw the edges of the cast aluminum ends need additional attention.

IMG_4624.JPG

Was feeling good and making progress. All the masking was removed from the car body. Started to apply grab irons and corner ladders when disaster struck AGAIN!

IMG_4627.JPG

In the above photo, some people can see the different yellow colors between the car sides and the corner ladders. Yes, they are different. The ladders have a tint of orange with the marigold yellow paint. Realized I grabbed the wrong cans of yellow (John Deere Yellow) to paint the car sides. So the roof, ladders and grab irons were already marigold yellow. Naturally, the largest area was impacted, but also the most notable. Graphics had already been order...to match the marigold yellow. The car sides lost!

So out came the newspaper and masking tape AGAIN! Everything on the car was masked off except the upper car sides and the corner stirrup steps. The yellow surfaces were scuffed up with Scotch Brite pads. The dust created was wiped away. A soft cloth soaked with 99% alcohol was used for the wipe down...which was followed by a dry brushing to remove any lint or towel fuzz.

After the correct marigold yellow was applied...

IMG_4636.JPG

Believe the near, lower green corner was where the paint wrinkle was corrected.

IMG_4637.JPG

Ahhhh, the Rutland box car was finally looking like the models and photos I had seen on line. Black ends and underside. Yellow roof and upper sides. Green lower sides. After the few mishaps, was able to heave a sigh of relief. Of course, vinyl graphic applications present a few challenges along the way as well, there's a few things that can go wrong there too (but that didn't happen). Will be back soon enough. Carl B.
Life is like a sewer...what you get out of it depends on what you put into it!
I don't walk on water...I just learned where some of the stepping stones are!
I love mankind...it's some of the people I can't stand!

Harold_V
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Re: Economy Box 'n Reef

Post by Harold_V » Tue Jun 22, 2021 3:25 pm

ccvstmr wrote:
Tue Jun 22, 2021 8:07 am
Don't know how the tape would tolerate that kind of abuse.
Actually, it tolerates direct blasting, just as most rubber type products do. I use it routinely when blasting items that I need to mask. By far superior to masking tape or duct tape. I'm sold on the product for use in the blast cabinet. I also use electrical vinyl tape when it's appropriate. Both of those products can be directly blasted for a prolonged period of time without degradation. They do change appearance, as the blasting makes them rather dull in appearance.

The interior of my blast cabinet is lined with 1/16" thick self adhesive rubber. It was installed back in the late 80's. It has prevented damage to the interior and is just now beginning to fail in spots. This rubber product is what is used for engraving granite headstones. The mask is applied, then carved to expose areas where text is desired. It resists blasting totally, while rapidly eroding the granite. Works great!

The window in blast cabinets can be protected by installing a thin film of urethane. I place the film in the opening, then the glass, or in my case, the Lucite, which is what I've used for years. The urethane film resists blasting quite nicely. It does require the occasional cleaning, as it gets covered with traces of rust and other debris that is removed in the blasting process. I use a bit of Windex and a rag. The same piece of urethane film can be used almost indefinitely.

I've enjoyed this thread.

H
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ccvstmr
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Re: Economy Box 'n Reef

Post by ccvstmr » Wed Jun 23, 2021 8:57 am

Harold_V wrote:
Tue Jun 22, 2021 3:25 pm

Actually, it tolerates direct blasting, just as most rubber type products do. I use it routinely when blasting items that I need to mask. By far superior to masking tape or duct tape. I'm sold on the product for use in the blast cabinet. I also use electrical vinyl tape when it's appropriate.

The interior of my blast cabinet is lined with 1/16" thick self adhesive rubber. It was installed back in the late 80's. It has prevented damage to the interior and is just now beginning to fail in spots. This rubber product is what is used for engraving granite headstones. The mask is applied, then carved to expose areas where text is desired. It resists blasting totally, while rapidly eroding the granite. Works great!

The window in blast cabinets can be protected by installing a thin film of urethane. I place the film in the opening, then the glass, or in my case, the Lucite, which is what I've used for years. The urethane film resists blasting quite nicely. ... The same piece of urethane film can be used almost indefinitely.

I've enjoyed this thread.

H
Hello again Harold...

A number of years ago, wife and I were in upstate VT when we visited the Rock of Ages granite quarry. No doubt, that was some deep hole they were pulling granite slabs out of. Took a factory tour of the cutting/finishing shop. As part of the tour, even let us sand blast a piece of granite using one of their rubber masks. As you indicated...the rubber is impervious to the blast. BUT, have to be careful the blast spray does not undercut the rubber mask edges.

Did a quick search for urethane film for my friends sand blast cabinet. Starting with McMaster Carr and then looking elsewhere, didn't see any clear urethane film. Can I ask, what was your source? 'Cause I get tired of replacing the transparency slide film on the cabinet glass (I've done that more than a few times).

Glad you're enjoying the thread. Closing in on the finish....but I digress...Carl B.
Life is like a sewer...what you get out of it depends on what you put into it!
I don't walk on water...I just learned where some of the stepping stones are!
I love mankind...it's some of the people I can't stand!

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ccvstmr
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Re: Economy Box 'n Reef

Post by ccvstmr » Wed Jun 23, 2021 9:30 am

Door Security - Part 1

With the painting for the box and reefer behind me, going to side track here again to review the last of the details for these cars...door latches. Found Precision Steel Car sells nice door hardware castings for both types of cars. So, rather than trying to cobble something together that might look like door latches and take too long to fabricate, decided to purchase hardware for both cars and wait for delivery.

As long as the box car painting was just completed, will review the box car door latch installation. Let's start with a photo of what this latch looks like in the real world...

door latch 3.JPG

Here's the castings from PSC alongside the box car door. Knew right away I'd have to account for the different in "height" between the car sides and the door casting...which protruded approx. 1/4" from the car siding. Would also need a spacer between the door ribs to support that part of the latch mechanism as well. Isn't it amazing how one solution creates more work elsewhere? (don't answer that). Noticed too, the vertical "key" didn't sit square on top of the main casting. Would have to see about changing that.

IMG_4439.JPG

The height difference was addressed by cutting a piece of 1/4" thick aluminum and beveling the (3) exposed edges to eliminate the square edges. Decided to use a couple Philips flat head wood screws to attach the spacer to the wood car side...and then use a flat head machine screw to attach the door latch casting to the spacer.

IMG_4440.JPG

Here's the allen socket head screw holding the main door latch casting to the spacer block. Figured the screw would be hidden by the "key".

IMG_4441.JPG

Then found, if the key was turned around so the hollow back was facing out, the top of the key would sit level on the door latch mechanism. The reason the hollow part of the key originally to the rear...was for a screw mounted on the back side of the casting to hold the key captive. The key could be pulled up and dropped...but it couldn't be removed. Can you imagine look along the tracks for a lost casting like that? (don't answer that). Had another idea to make the key captive.

During this time, came up with a solution to hold the latch captive as well. Would use an aluminum spacing block to fit inside the door ribs. Machined a shoulder for the latch and used one of the brass ovals I have for the grab iron mounting pads...to hold the latch captive, but still allow for some movement. While it may LOOK LIKE the doors can be opened, the doors are screwed to the car body. In short...they ain't never gonna open! The door casting screw heads were covered over with JB Weld and sanded to the door contour. For the latch...simply used some 2-56 brass hex head screws to hold the spacer to the door and hold the latch to the spacer.

IMG_4444.JPG

And how was the key going to be held captive? Drilled a small hole at the bottom of the key hollow...and fed a jewelry/beading clasp thru that bottom hole. Found these at either Hobby Lobby or Michaels craft stores. The clasp...intended to look like a door seal, could also double as a pad lock (from 10 feet away). Holding the key captive was solved.

After the parts were painted and mounted (except for the one hex head screw that was touched up after installation), here's how the entire mechanism came together and looked mounted on the side of the car.

Made one other modification to the door latch mechanism castings...bent an offset in the latch handle. Why? Knew in time someone would walk by the car sitting on a yard track and their pants leg would catch the handle and bend it (the wrong way of course). The handle offset would keep the exposed handle close and tight to the car side.

IMG_4630.JPG

The door latch may not seem like much, but it's those little things that DO stand out when looking at the side of the car. No doubt, worth the investment to purchase some nicely cast door latch hardware. Next time, will cover the reefer door latch mechanism. Carl B.
Life is like a sewer...what you get out of it depends on what you put into it!
I don't walk on water...I just learned where some of the stepping stones are!
I love mankind...it's some of the people I can't stand!

Harold_V
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Re: Economy Box 'n Reef

Post by Harold_V » Thu Jun 24, 2021 1:55 am

ccvstmr wrote:
Wed Jun 23, 2021 8:57 am
Did a quick search for urethane film for my friends sand blast cabinet. Starting with McMaster Carr and then looking elsewhere, didn't see any clear urethane film. Can I ask, what was your source?
The first piece I got was years ago, provided by a friend. He got it from a guy who ran a plastic operation. This was in Utah.

A few years ago I started hunting for a replacement. It had slowly yellowed and had gotten etched enough to diminish transparency. I had no luck in general, but found someone online who represented the material. I contacted him and asked about making a small purchase. His response to me was that he'd gladly send me a sample, no charge. How I wish I'd have saved the information, but, alas, I did not. I have no clue where I found him. Sorry I'm not more help.

You may wish to try Harbor Freight, believe it or not. Somewhere in the far reaches of my mind I seem to recall they offered the covering for their blast cabinets. Could be wrong. Getting old and goofy.

H
Wise people talk because they have something to say. Fools talk because they have to say something.

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ccvstmr
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Re: Economy Box 'n Reef

Post by ccvstmr » Thu Jun 24, 2021 7:55 am

Harold_V wrote:
Thu Jun 24, 2021 1:55 am

You may wish to try Harbor Freight, believe it or not. Somewhere in the far reaches of my mind I seem to recall they offered the covering for their blast cabinets. Could be wrong. Getting old and goofy.

H
Harold, our experience with the Harbor Freight film (some time ago) wasn't that good. The HF clear film lasted about the same as the transparency material we've been using. SO...the search continues. That's for describing your experience...and lucky-to-find source. Carl B.
Life is like a sewer...what you get out of it depends on what you put into it!
I don't walk on water...I just learned where some of the stepping stones are!
I love mankind...it's some of the people I can't stand!

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