Page 4 of 6

Re: 90-Ton 2-8-2 Build, 1.5"/ft. Scale, 7.5" Gauge

Posted: Wed Feb 07, 2018 3:37 pm
by NP317
Berkman:
Here's another pic of the assembled trailing truck in the frame. The dual radius bars are just visible, as are the axle-box assemblies.
Expand and study, if interested.

You can see that the frame is milled to 1/2 thickness at the training truck. This adds to the available lateral motion.
~RussN
2-8-2 Frame1 11-2012.JPG

Re: 90-Ton 2-8-2 Build, 1.5"/ft. Scale, 7.5" Gauge

Posted: Thu Feb 08, 2018 11:52 am
by NP317
Berkman:
Here's another pic showing the rear truck spring assembly on the drawing, detailing the truck side view.
The drawing might help you visualize the swing mechanism allowing lateral motion of the rear axle.
~RN
2-8-2 Rear Spring Assy.JPG

Re: 90-Ton 2-8-2 Build, 1.5"/ft. Scale, 7.5" Gauge

Posted: Thu Feb 08, 2018 12:32 pm
by Berkman
Thank you very much for the explanation and photos!

Re: 90-Ton 2-8-2 Build, 1.5"/ft. Scale, 7.5" Gauge

Posted: Thu Feb 08, 2018 10:22 pm
by NP317
You are welcome. Need more?
~RN

Re: 90-Ton 2-8-2 Build, 1.5"/ft. Scale, 7.5" Gauge

Posted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 4:13 pm
by Asteamhead
Hello Russ,
Your firebox sheets are looking great! Thank you for posting those photos and clear explanations to us all!
Your method of preparing and seting the rivets looks very similar to what I'm using to do with the cab of my A. A lot of precise drilling before setting the rivets are rewarded by that cool looking - worth all the time anyway 8) .

All the best by
Asteamhead

Re: 90-Ton 2-8-2 Build, 1.5"/ft. Scale, 7.5" Gauge

Posted: Fri Feb 09, 2018 9:11 pm
by NP317
Thank you, Asteamhead.
I look forward to the continued reports on your locomotive build.
~Russ

Re: 90-Ton 2-8-2 Build, 1.5"/ft. Scale, 7.5" Gauge

Posted: Sun Feb 11, 2018 1:31 pm
by NP317
Pontiacguy1 wrote:
Fri Jan 19, 2018 8:57 am
Where did you get that little plate that says 'Crown Sheet' ?? That would be a neat little addition for ANY steamer, whether it is super detailed or not. I have a tendency to make a few punch marks along the backhead right where the crown sheet is, just so that whoever plumbs it (if it's not me), inspects it, or just wonders, will know exactly where the crown is in relation to the gauge glass.
[snip]
Pontiacguy1:
I finally "re-found" the seller of that "CROWN SHEET" plate:
Keim Steam Pump!
http://www.keimsteampump.com/uploads/KS ... 2017_b.pdf

I purchased the one specified for 1" scale. It's perfect for my use.
~RussN

Re: 90-Ton 2-8-2 Build, 1.5"/ft. Scale, 7.5" Gauge

Posted: Mon Feb 12, 2018 8:19 am
by Pontiacguy1
Thanks! That's a nice little bit of jewelry right there.

Re: 90-Ton 2-8-2 Build, 1.5"/ft. Scale, 7.5" Gauge

Posted: Thu May 03, 2018 6:27 pm
by NP317
Well, it's time to share some more progress, now that the snows have cleared and I've enjoyed several sidecar motorcycle rides this year.
I have finished the plumbing (7 systems!) and they all work as planned (!) I'll share pics of some of those systems.

Two back head plumbing pics:
Plumbing 1 sml.jpg
Plumbing 2 sml.jpg
Of course there is much hiding under the cab floors. If someone wants a closer look at the propane main/pilot control system, the injector mounting, the axel pump, the water return line from the axel pump, the steam and vacuum brake systems, or the connections to the tender, let me know and I'll post photos of whatever you are interested in.

Cylinder cocks:
I installed the steam operated Super Scale cocks, which are unfortunately no longer available. They are scale and rather compact, and require significant piping/union installations under the front of the engine. My locomotive's low cylinders provide opportunity for damage to the cocks from derailments, so compact and simple down there is good.
Because my loco is nearly completed and I simply do not want to lie under the stand to work on it in constricted spaces, I designed a steam distribution manifold to be located where i could reach it.
SuperScale cylinder cocks:
Cyl Cocks 1 sml.jpg
Steam distribution manifold:
Cyl Cocks 3 sml.jpg
The 1/8" copper lines attach to unions at the manifold and at the rear of the cocks. They are threaded 1/8 - 56 Model Taper Pipe. (Most all of my plumbing work is threaded MTP.) Both locations are relatively easy for me to reach, and snaking the lines from the manifold to the cocks provided all the required expansion loops needed. There is a drain valve at the manifold, and each cock has a plug that can be removed to clear the lines for cold winter storage. I like to plan ahead, and not spend my time making repairs.
Enough for this posting.
~RN

Re: 90-Ton 2-8-2 Build, 1.5"/ft. Scale, 7.5" Gauge

Posted: Thu May 03, 2018 7:03 pm
by NP317
Next I installed the mechanical lubricator, lines, and drive rod.
Lubricator 1 sml.jpg
Lubricator 2 sml.jpg
I am using a lubricator from American Model Engineering Supply:
http://www.americanmodeleng.com/id15.html
now owned/operated by Godshalls Machine.:
www.godshallscustommachining.com
The description presently on line appears to be of their older design(?). Or not...
Mine has a clutch drive, two pump outlets, and no sight window.

Of course, I had accidentally lost the oil prime in the pumps from several years of knocking it around my shop. After careful partial disassembly and re-priming, it delivers as advertised now.
I connected the pump arm to the top of the valve links, so the motion is constant regardless of valve gear setting. As adjusted now, the pump delivers 1 drop of valve oil to each cylinder, every 7-8 revolutions of the drivers. Experience will tell if that is OK. Adjustment of oil delivery is very simple to do "on-the-road."

The connecting rod is 1/8" diameter, with ends turned and treaded for 4-40. Because the rod has two mild bends in it, and does the work by pulling and not pushing, this rod has all the strength required and won't collapse or bend accidentally.
I installed commercial linkages from R/C airplane control surfaces, using steel DuBro links. Makes things so much simpler.

The tubing to the steam input lines is again 1/8" copper tubing, with commercial connections as supplied on the pump. I fabricated check valves at the inputs to the locomotive steam lines. With the checks internal to the pumps, there are two checks to prevent back blow into the lubricator. I think this is very much required, as one check can fail, stopping lubrication to the cylinders, with the resulting damage to the main steam valves and pistons. Such a tiny valve, and SO important. Last month I quickly identified exactly this failure to a new live steamer, working on his newly-purchased, used Allen 4-4-0. He's back on track, literally...

Let me know what other systems you'd like to see photos of.
Education on demand, online!
~RN

Re: 90-Ton 2-8-2 Build, 1.5"/ft. Scale, 7.5" Gauge

Posted: Thu May 17, 2018 12:59 pm
by NP317
Yesterday was the First Steam Test, after ten interrupted years of building.
It's ALIVE!

And I have a list of nagging stuff to fix, of course.
Biggest issue is the water glass seems unable to read to the top. With the boiler completely full for the hydro test, the glass had air in the top 1/4" Not good.
So I will re-think the plumbing, and I ask This Community for ideas on cause and solution.
Second issue is to machine a new burner jet with smaller hole. A simple job. The propane fire was too yellow, and not blue. Made some haze out the stack.
But the burner is HOT and makes steam quickly! It will be easy to fire this locomotive.

Otherwise, I'm REALLY pleased with the nearly-finished locomotive.
'Still have two running boards and the cab to fabricate, and install some cosmetic plumbing. No boredom...
~RN
Mikado First Steam1 sml.jpg

Re: 90-Ton 2-8-2 Build, 1.5"/ft. Scale, 7.5" Gauge

Posted: Thu May 17, 2018 1:26 pm
by Asteamhead
Hello Russ,
Your engine looks fine with all those useful details! Should be a pleasure to it's engineer.
Maybe the reason of trapped air in the water glass is it's height above top of the boiler? Should not happen when under steam yet.
Installing double checks in the oil feeds sounds so right! I did the same with all the oil feeds to avoid cocking the oil pumps at slow, hard starts.
Good luck and keep us informed, please!

Asteamhead