CAD conversation to G-Code

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Kelligirl921
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CAD conversation to G-Code

Post by Kelligirl921 » Sun May 05, 2019 5:35 pm

Hello,
Is it possible to convert CAD to G-code? As it turns out, a template of what I produce is a G-Code template and it has gone missing due to a glitch in software. I do have it in CAD format but do not know how to convert, if possible. If not, any idea how or where to get G-Code done in order to re-start production of my parts?
Thank you,
Kelli

Magicniner
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Re: CAD conversation to G-Code

Post by Magicniner » Mon May 06, 2019 4:58 am

Depending upon part complexity it could be hand coded or you could use CAM.
For someone else to do it for you they would need details of the job material, tooling used, your machine and it's controller to ensure compatible code and the correct feeds & speeds.

RMinMN
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Re: CAD conversation to G-Code

Post by RMinMN » Mon May 06, 2019 4:59 am

Yes, with some caveats. There are quite a few programs to do this, some with more functionality than others and some which require a specific format of the file to convert. If the part is simple, something like this may suffice.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oNCHRWY9Meo

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Bill Shields
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Re: CAD conversation to G-Code

Post by Bill Shields » Tue May 07, 2019 6:50 am

first and foremost, you need to know the target machine / control.
Too many things going on to bother listing them.

earlgo
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Re: CAD conversation to G-Code

Post by earlgo » Tue May 07, 2019 8:46 am

Long ago in a (job) far, far away, I was tasked with programming a Cincinnati Milicron T-10 horizontal mill. I was sent to Cincinnati to learn how to program the machine and I was also sent to a Numeridex training class in Chicago to learn how to use their software to draw tool paths and have it converted into G-Code. In the end, after all this training, I discovered that I was much more efficient in writing the G-code than the software was. Perhaps things have progressed since 1984. The upshot was that I wrote the code in Microsoft text editor and it was sent to the machine controller direct where it ran successfully. My point here is that you may be able to write successful code without fancy software.
--earlgo
Before you do anything, you must do something else first. - Washington's principle.

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Bill Shields
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Re: CAD conversation to G-Code

Post by Bill Shields » Tue May 07, 2019 8:59 am

Earlgo:

your deduction assumes a couple if things

1> simple machines
2> person with pencil in hand understands the machines, manufacturing processes and the codes necessary to create them.
Too many things going on to bother listing them.

earlgo
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Re: CAD conversation to G-Code

Post by earlgo » Tue May 07, 2019 5:40 pm

Mr. Shields, your points are all very true.
The Cincinnati T-10 was a 10HP horizontal with a 2 pallet changer, 2 45 pocket tool chains with automatic tool changer, an electronic probe and an operator that was really good. Not exactly a simple machine. I guess it probably cannot compare to a home shop machine. My bad. Teledyne Oster used it to make gear boxes and carriages for their pipe threading equipment. The operator loaded the rough casting on the tombstone on a pallet, punched the button, and the pallet rotated into position, the tool changer started and picked the proper tool from the chain and stuck it in the spindle. The spindle fired up, turned on the coolant, and made chips like one can only imagine from a home shop machine. When the cycle was done, the pallet rotated and the finished part came out and the next rough casting went in. It was really cool to see run. Needless to say, I learned a lot on that job.
--earlgo
Before you do anything, you must do something else first. - Washington's principle.

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Bill Shields
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Re: CAD conversation to G-Code

Post by Bill Shields » Tue May 07, 2019 7:12 pm

yes, I am sure you did, as did I on my first NC controlled machine.

There is a lot more to converting lines and arcs to toolpaths, as I hope Kelligirl will begin to realize.

it isn't (yet) like waving a magic wand in Harry Potter Land and making a part appear from a drawing.
Too many things going on to bother listing them.

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