Formed cab roof angle 16 ga. steel

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DaveD
Posts: 136
Joined: Mon Aug 25, 2008 6:54 pm
Location: Central Virginia

Re: Formed cab roof angle 16 ga. steel

Post by DaveD » Tue Jun 12, 2018 6:25 am

Jack, I will try forming the angles per your reply above. This will be an easy attempt since I already have the formers. All I need is a rawhide mallet.

I did this in much the same manner using 303/4 (I forgot which) 16 ga. when building the trailer truck wheel relief notches in my ash pan. Much smaller parts, but exactly the same method, and they turned out well (photos attached).

And Dave, yes, I will anneal it. If none of this works, though I believe it will, I will also try some extruded brass angle. Thanks again.
Attachments
Ash Pan 23_edited-1.jpg
P8246879_edited-1.jpg
P8256891_edited-1.jpg
Dave Dalton

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JBodenmann
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Location: Grover Beach, California

Re: Formed cab roof angle 16 ga. steel

Post by JBodenmann » Wed Jun 13, 2018 9:54 am

Hello. My Friends
Hi Dave, if you anneal the steel try soaking it in Ospho. This will remove any scale. This will also take the scale off of hot rolled steel.
By the way your work is excellent!
Jack

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Fender
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Re: Formed cab roof angle 16 ga. steel

Post by Fender » Wed Jun 13, 2018 6:18 pm

DaveD really does fine work. The bronze color on the SS ashpan is from heating it in a heat-treating oven until a light brown is achieved, as I recall.
Dan Watson

DaveD
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Joined: Mon Aug 25, 2008 6:54 pm
Location: Central Virginia

Oxidizing stainless steel for color

Post by DaveD » Sat Jun 16, 2018 8:14 am

Fender wrote:
Wed Jun 13, 2018 6:18 pm
DaveD really does fine work. The bronze color on the SS ashpan is from heating it in a heat-treating oven until a light brown is achieved, as I recall.
Dan, thanks for the compliment and for reminding me about this. I thought I had posted something in chaski on this technique, but I guess I forgot to.

The ash pan is made of mostly 304 stainless and the bronze color is an oxidation coating. I got the idea to color it from some stainless steel art work that had been heated to different colors at various temperatures. It had been placed outside and the color had stood up well to the elements over a several year period, so I thought I might be able to apply this to my ash pan. My primary reason was to tone down the silver SS color and have the ash pan disappear quietly into the background. I have a programmable furnace, but small (9x9x9 inches), and I did some testing on small pieces of my 304 0.060 sheet. I tried various temperatures and various soak times and came up with the optimum temperature of about 600 degrees F (if I remember right) and a soak of 1 to 1.5 hours. Soaking at a higher temperature would have gotten it to that color more quickly but I believe the long soak made for a more durable coating. Going beyond this bronze color will take it to a purple and I did not want that color (note in an earlier photo the ash pan dump lever is slightly purple--it is 416 stainless and colors more quickly than the 304. Keeping the temperature down to around 600 also prevented too much oxidation of the copper rivets.

I then abused the resulting sample pieces and found they held up very well to scuffing, light sanding, and so forth. I then applied some high temp flat black Rust-Oleum spray paint to half of a sample, masking it from the unpainted portion. When cured, the paint is almost impossible to remove, even when scraping from the masked margin. So it appears to me that this is a good way to color stainless and to provide a good base for painting. Since I will be running the loco on propane I am not concerned about further coloration. I could have applied some high temp paint but didn't feel that there was a need.

When the ash pan was complete I took it to a heat treating firm and had it treated in an atmospheric oven. They had never heard of doing this to stainless and were surprised when it turned out like I told them it would! It is now permanently installed on my P7 and with all of the stuff being added to the boiler it is indeed disappearing nicely into the background. Note on the attached photo that you hardly notice the ash pan.

I hope this may be of some use to chaski members!
Attachments
2017 12 progress.jpg
Dave Dalton

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