Live Steam Accessories 3-D Models

This forum is dedicated to the Live Steam Hobbyist Community.

Moderators: Harold_V, WJH, cbrew

Post Reply
jdorn
Posts: 15
Joined: Fri May 06, 2016 6:00 am

Live Steam Accessories 3-D Models

Post by jdorn » Thu May 13, 2021 8:29 am

I know this is a long shot, but I recently gained access to a 3-D printer and would love to print some accessories for my RGS 20 build. In the long term I will make working components, but I thought a quick cheap way to spruce up the engine would be 3-D printed ones. I would be looking for turbogenerator, headlight, air pump, number board, etc.
I totally understand if people who invested the time to make these solid files don't want to share them for fear of me printing and selling to the masses. I do not want to do that. Just thought it would be a neat, cheap, and quick way to get some accessories for my engine, until I get enough money and time to make working ones.

Thanks,
Jesse

Mark Landgraf
Posts: 81
Joined: Sun Jun 09, 2013 9:42 pm
Location: Albany, NY

Re: Live Steam Accessories 3-D Models

Post by Mark Landgraf » Thu May 13, 2021 10:06 am

Jesse

You will probably find the mounting 3d products directly to your loco will present at least 2 problems. One, they won't take the heat, and two, they won't be durable enough. You should be thinking of using a wax like string that can be burned out in the lost wax process, or using the 3d process to make mold parts for casting in a later process. Think of a driver wheel in 3d that gets mounted to a board for sand casting.

As for drawings from which to work from. Try the Denver Public Library. I know they have a huge narrow gage photo collection. There may be drawings there too.

Drawings for appurtenances are usually are from the manufacturer of that appurtenance, not the locomotive mfr. Please post manufacturer and model, i may be able to assist. A warning on the headlight. First find the flash lite reflector and bulb combo that you want to use and then build the housing to fit those components. In your calculations remember to include shrinkage factors for wax and metal. Lighter fluid can sometimes be helpful in smoothing out the sometimes rough surfaces on 3d printed parts.

This is not a cheap hobby. For lost wax casting services you may want to investigate:
http://www.hildebrandesigns.com/

Mark Landgraf
Albany NY

User avatar
Bill Shields
Posts: 6590
Joined: Fri Dec 21, 2007 4:57 am
Location: Somewhere in the World
Contact:

Re: Live Steam Accessories 3-D Models

Post by Bill Shields » Thu May 13, 2021 10:42 am

Mark Landgraf wrote:
Thu May 13, 2021 10:06 am

This is not a cheap hobby.

Mark Landgraf
Albany NY
Oy...is that ever a true statement!
Too many things going on to bother listing them.

User avatar
ChipsAhoy
Posts: 223
Joined: Wed Feb 18, 2015 12:23 pm
Location: Arizona

Re: Live Steam Accessories 3-D Models

Post by ChipsAhoy » Thu May 13, 2021 2:10 pm

OnShape is a handy drawing program that is free (unless you purchase the high dollar upgrade). Being free, the drawings that you and others create are the available to the public. You may find a source of legal free drawings that you can use, one site I found is Thingiverse.com. Drawings are most usually *.slt.
After you have found or create a suitable drawing, it is processed by a program where it "slices" the drawing into layers suitable for your printer to digest. I use CURA, it to is free. Some if not all the slicers will give you the opportunity to "expand" the part to accomodate shrinkage by defining the metal you wish to pour. A typical medium to use in the 3D printer is PLA. PLA does not hold up to heat at all, parts left in a car in AZ can melt into the seats... don't ask me how I know this. But, there are other "plastics" that can be used in most printers. Find the material that suits your needs (pla, PETg, abs etc.), then verify that your printer can process it. Most of the slicer programs will adjust the printers nozzle temp for you, but not all, you may have to do it manually in your printer software.
I am absolutely a beginner. If you have access to a "resin" type printer...all bets are off, I don't know anything about them except $$$.
Scotty

User avatar
Bill Shields
Posts: 6590
Joined: Fri Dec 21, 2007 4:57 am
Location: Somewhere in the World
Contact:

Re: Live Steam Accessories 3-D Models

Post by Bill Shields » Thu May 13, 2021 3:47 pm

or you can have shapeways print it in metal...but do not plan on tapping any holes in it...
Too many things going on to bother listing them.

KenG
Posts: 42
Joined: Mon Aug 31, 2015 12:48 pm
Location: Manhattan, Kansas

Re: Live Steam Accessories 3-D Models

Post by KenG » Thu May 13, 2021 4:31 pm

Jesse,

There is a group of modelers on the Facebook page "2.5" (or so)Construction" who have made 3D models for parts they intend to sell. For the hours of work that go into researching and modelling appurtenances I would not expect them to give away their hard work.

Steve Nelson has pictures on his website tsmtrains of what looks like plastic 3D printed air pumps on his C21. The C21 is similar to the RGS 20.

Ken

User avatar
Greg_Lewis
Posts: 2210
Joined: Wed Jan 15, 2003 2:44 pm
Location: Fresno, CA

Re: Live Steam Accessories 3-D Models

Post by Greg_Lewis » Thu May 13, 2021 10:14 pm

There is also some stuff on the Shapeways site.
Greg Lewis, Prop.
Eyeball Engineering — Home of the dull toolbit.
Our motto: "That looks about right."
Celebrating 30 years of turning perfectly good metal into bits of useless scrap.

User avatar
Dick_Morris
Posts: 2433
Joined: Sat Jan 04, 2003 2:09 pm
Location: Anchorage, AK

Re: Live Steam Accessories 3-D Models

Post by Dick_Morris » Fri May 14, 2021 4:17 am

I haven't had any luck finding free stl files except for a few European prototypes, caricatures, and toys.

In my opinion, home printed 3D parts have a place in the hobby, but mostly for car or diesel parts where heat isn't an issue. For a steam locomotives they are good for mock ups, for testing fit, or to print patterns for investment casting. Although less robust than metal, once you have a print file its easy to print a replacement. I wouldn't hesitate in using MSLA parts for doors, window frames, under car decorative hardware, brake wheels, reefer hinges, dummy nuts and ogee washers, etc.

MSLA resin parts will withstand heat better than filament printed parts and some sellers claim their resin handles temperature better than generic resin.

When used for investment casting they open a lot of possibilities. See some of my castings at https://www.chaski.org/homemachinist/vi ... 0&start=72

Post Reply