Die holder

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earlgo
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Die holder

Post by earlgo » Thu Apr 13, 2017 12:24 pm

Anyone have a favorite lathe tailstock die holder for button dies? Drawings?

--earlgo
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SteveM
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Re: Die holder

Post by SteveM » Thu Apr 13, 2017 1:35 pm

Chris at Clickspring made a nice one:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MmGzzZEFSJU
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QmBeofg4d_A

I think you have to be a patron to get the prints, but it's pretty self explanatory.

Steve

Harold_V
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Re: Die holder

Post by Harold_V » Thu Apr 13, 2017 3:25 pm

No prints, but a simple one that works exceedingly well can be made by boring a large diameter piece of steel to accommodate the die. Behind the die cavity one should drill, bore (to establish concentricity), then ream to size a ½" hole, through the long piece (maybe 3" long oal). This hole is the guide to keep the body straight and concentric. It is sized to fit either a ½" dowel pin, or a ½" drill blank, which is chucked in the tailstock. The outside of the die holder is knurled, as it is gripped by hand to use the die, and is a sliding slip fit on the dowel.

Harold
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SteveM
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Re: Die holder

Post by SteveM » Thu Apr 13, 2017 3:37 pm

On one like Harold's:
Image
you can have a different recess on each side so that you can use two different size dies.

Your torque limiter is that when the die bottoms, you let go (or it spins in your hand).

If you want to thread by hand, you might want a few holes around the periphery for a tommy bar.

Steve

Russ Hanscom
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Re: Die holder

Post by Russ Hanscom » Thu Apr 13, 2017 5:45 pm

I have a similar, with a 6" dia aluminum smooth wheel added for more torque as I regularly tap up to 1/2-13 in steel. Mine has a #3 Morse taper on the end to go into the tail stock.

One more option is to make one with a tap holder then you can tap as well.

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Re: Die holder

Post by Glenn Brooks » Thu Apr 13, 2017 10:25 pm

SteveM wrote:On one like Harold's:
Image
you can have a different recess on each side so that you can use two different size dies.

Your torque limiter is that when the die bottoms, you let go (or it spins in your hand).

If you want to thread by hand, you might want a few holes around the periphery for a tommy bar.

Steve

I've never understood how, of if it is possible, to run a tap or die with power in the lathe, and control the feed by hand. Steves message, above, suggests somehow tapping under,power, but holding onto the holder by hand. Is this what is implied ?? If so, what is the proper method to follow. Are there any 'gotchas, in the process?

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SteveM
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Re: Die holder

Post by SteveM » Thu Apr 13, 2017 11:27 pm

By hand would only be possible with small threads. Anything larger and you'd need a gorilla to hold it.

Steve

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10KPete
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Re: Die holder

Post by 10KPete » Thu Apr 13, 2017 11:31 pm

Here is a tap handle holder that is simple and effective:

http://mikesworkshop.weebly.com/tailsto ... older.html

If it is made to slide on a pin held in the tailstock then it can be interchangeable with a die holder and used the same way.

Pete
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Harold_V
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Re: Die holder

Post by Harold_V » Fri Apr 14, 2017 1:30 am

Glenn Brooks wrote:I've never understood how, of if it is possible, to run a tap or die with power in the lathe, and control the feed by hand. Steves message, above, suggests somehow tapping under,power, but holding onto the holder by hand. Is this what is implied ?? If so, what is the proper method to follow.
For starters, this works for small diameter threads, not large. I'd suggest that even ¼"-20 would be overwhelming, depending on one's grip and the diameter of the body of the die holder in use. I could be wrong, however, as I've never tried using one for anything larger than a #10 thread. I have either single pointed, or used a die head instead.

That said, the process is simple. The dowel is chucked in the tailstock, which is located near the part to be threaded. Acceptable speed for the thread in question is selected, the pin lubricated, the spindle started, the part lubricated, then the body is moved forward towards the now spinning object that is to be threaded. Enough pressure is exerted on the body to engage the thread, at which time it should be allowed to advance as required. All the hand does is prevent the body from rotating. If there's a problem, or when the thread depth is achieved, all that is required to stop cutting is to let go of the body. The final length can be achieved by stopping the spindle and turning the body by hand, assuming length is critical.

Once to depth, the lathe is reversed, the body grasped, and the die is extracted.
Are there any 'gotchas, in the process?
Not really. Just ensure that you have ample clearance on each end, so the body can achieve proper depth, and can be extracted fully without hitting anything (like bottoming out on the chuck which holds the pin). This is a very simple and safe way to create small threads, especially if the threads are either roughed first, by single point, or the die is opened for a roughing pass, then closed for a finish pass. If the die is sharp and has been properly ground, there's a pretty good chance of achieving a respectable thread. I don't recommend using dull dies, as they tear the material and produce questionable quality.

On the subject of sharp dies---a guy with a high speed die grinder, a small mounted point and some dexterity should be able to restore the cutting edge on a die. Be mindful of the rake angle if you choose to try. If the die is chipped, or badly rounded, probably a waste of time, though.

Harold
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earlgo
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Re: Die holder

Post by earlgo » Fri Apr 14, 2017 8:58 am

Thanks guys. I saw Clickspring's die holder and wondered if there were other options equally as good. Apparently that is the basic principle with whatever embellishments the owner prefers.
I was hoping someone had a "floating" die holder, similar to a floating reamer holder.
I guess I'll have to put on my thinking cap and see what happens. (Probably a surprise nap.)
Thanks again to all.

--earlgo
Before you do anything, you must do something else first. - Washington's principle.

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NP5002
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Re: Die holder

Post by NP5002 » Sat Apr 15, 2017 2:55 pm

American Model Engineering sells one.
http://www.americanmodeleng.com/id28.html

jcfx
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Re: Die holder

Post by jcfx » Sat Apr 15, 2017 5:00 pm

No affiliation, just a happy customer, I bought tap and die holder from Neil Butterfield,
take a look here -
http://www.neilsniche.com/

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