Building a model of a GG1

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Mr Ron
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Building a model of a GG1

Post by Mr Ron » Fri Nov 09, 2018 9:30 pm

Without a whole lot of drawings to reference, I'm trying to figure out how the body was mounted to the chassis of a GG1. The chassis is made up of two identical chassis, joined at the center with a pivot. Obviously the body is in one piece; only the chassis can articulate. How is the body attached to the chassis? It would appear to me that it can only be supported on one half of the articulated chassis. Some sort of guide would be used on the other half to support that half of the body. Does anyone have knowledge of how the GG1 was set up to articulate? The model I'm trying to build will be at 3/4 scale. This will be my most ambitious model project. I'll be taking modeler's license in the build. I want the body to look right and the entire model to operate like a GG1. I think an examination of how it's done on smaller models (HO, O, G scales) would give me the answer, but I don't have access to those models.
Mr.Ron from South Mississippi

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PRR5406
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Re: Building a model of a GG1

Post by PRR5406 » Sat Nov 10, 2018 7:43 am

I have GG1 drawings. If you send me your email, I can link you.
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Mr Ron
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Re: Building a model of a GG1

Post by Mr Ron » Sat Nov 10, 2018 10:07 am

PRR5406 wrote:
Sat Nov 10, 2018 7:43 am
I have GG1 drawings. If you send me your email, I can link you.
Thanks for the offer. My address is ronaldseto@bellsouth.net. What part of Maine do you live in. I used to work at the Bath Iron Works and the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in the early 60's. I am now retired in South Mississippi, but originally a new Yorker.
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ccvstmr
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Re: Building a model of a GG1

Post by ccvstmr » Sat Nov 10, 2018 10:50 am

Ron...
Couldn't imagine why someone in AL would have an appreciation for a Northeast Corridor loco...until I saw family history.

Found the following photo on line. Knew I had seen this pix before. Might help you a little...
quill-fig7.jpg
Photo most likely came from the Pennsy Electric shops in Wilmington, DE. If you study the photo...you'll see on top of the frame between the pilot truck and drivers...a "pocket". Believe this was the kingpin/swivel point for the truck. The trucks were articulated with a large pin holding the fore/aft trucks linked.

The rectangular boxes you see sticking up between the drivers...would have been ducts for the traction motor cooling blowers. The blowers were housed in the nose at each end of the locomotive.

Don't believe the main drivers were equalized side-to-side...but they were equalized on the same side. The loco DID ride smooth.

Visibility for the train crew was a matter of frustration. The front cab windows were more like portholes...and the long nose didn't help viewing to the opposite side of the track. In later years, excess silicone caulk was around those windows to keep them from leaking.

If you do get to study builder drawings, you might note a #2 diesel fuel fill on the side of the loco body. You might wonder why anyone would pump diesel fuel into an electric locomotive...steam generation for passenger car heat.

Somewhere around here, might have photos from the late 70's when I worked for Amtrak. Haven't seen those pix in years though.

Hope that helps you some. Carl B.
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Mr Ron
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Re: Building a model of a GG1

Post by Mr Ron » Sat Nov 10, 2018 3:51 pm

ccvstmr wrote:
Sat Nov 10, 2018 10:50 am
Ron...
Couldn't imagine why someone in AL would have an appreciation for a Northeast Corridor loco...until I saw family history.

Found the following photo on line. Knew I had seen this pix before. Might help you a little...

Thanks for the pix. Every bit helps. Most of the models I build are of Pennsylvania or Long Island prototypes with a few electrics thrown in. I grew up watching the DD1's of the Long Island Railroad roar past, (silently). I spent time at the Sunnyside yards watching the trains and over at the Hoboken Terminal doing the same. I have been interested in railroads all my life, but worked in the shipbuilding industry; go figure.
Mr.Ron from South Mississippi

Glenn Brooks
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Re: Building a model of a GG1

Post by Glenn Brooks » Sun Nov 11, 2018 11:01 pm

Ron, there is or was here on Chaski at one time, a thread about a hobbyist that built a GG1. Also bunch of photos and some construction detail. Might pay to search around the archives and see if anything pops up.

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Mr Ron
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Re: Building a model of a GG1

Post by Mr Ron » Mon Nov 12, 2018 10:04 am

I did find some drawings which help out a lot. I also contacted the Pennsylvania State archives and got back a complete list of engineering drawings that cover the construction of a GG1 from 1934 up to 1961. The problem with the list is the titles of the drawings don't give a clue as to what is covered. What I'm after is how the cab was attached to the articulated chassis. That is not apparent from the titles of the drawings. There are thousands of drawings and I can't possibly order them all; but I will keep on trying and improvise where needed.
Mr.Ron from South Mississippi

SCBryan
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Re: Building a model of a GG1

Post by SCBryan » Mon Nov 12, 2018 12:36 pm

If I remember correctly, Live Steam Magazine had a series on building a GG1 several years ago (10-15?) that had quite a bit of detail. If you could find that series, it might be helpful.

Mr Ron
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Re: Building a model of a GG1

Post by Mr Ron » Tue Nov 13, 2018 12:31 pm

SCBryan wrote:
Mon Nov 12, 2018 12:36 pm
If I remember correctly, Live Steam Magazine had a series on building a GG1 several years ago (10-15?) that had quite a bit of detail. If you could find that series, it might be helpful.
Yes; I do have that issue and depended heavily on it in building my model. It is the January 1976 edition and if anyone is interested in a copy of the DD1 plans, let me know. I don't know if I would be violating any copyright laws, so please inform me if so.
Mr.Ron from South Mississippi

jscarmozza
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Re: Building a model of a GG1

Post by jscarmozza » Tue Nov 13, 2018 2:03 pm

Ron, this is how I mounted the body on my 1" GG-1. On top of the chassis is a 3/8" plate that I referee to as the surf board, it's pinned to the cassis at two points, on one end is a snug fit in a round hole, on the other end is a sliding fit in a slotted hole. The pins are mounted on rockers so the two articulated chassis halves can see saw under the surf board. The connecting pin between the chassis is spring loaded in a self centering bearing so it can rotate, rock and twist and square itself back up. Don't know if it's the right way, wrong way...but it's the way I did it. Hope this helps. I've been screwing around with this thing on and off for about 10 years, sorry I started it. Good luck with yours.
Attachments
image.jpeg
Slotted hole and pin in surf board
image.jpeg
Chassis pin and rocker
image.jpeg
Side view of center pin
image.jpeg
Top view of center pin

Mr Ron
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Re: Building a model of a GG1

Post by Mr Ron » Wed Nov 14, 2018 10:08 pm

This is the way I came up with, lacking any actual details. In the top sketch, I show (4) rollers (green), set at an angle corresponding to the radius starting at the pivot between the (2) frames. To the right of the rollers, is a pin which is guided by the curved member directly below the pin. The curved member is mounted on the underside of the cab. In operation, one half of the cab is solidly fixed to one half of the frame, while the other half of the frame can swing on curves. The (2) curved pieces directly below the rollers are tracks for the rollers to ride upon. I don't know if this makes any sense. I'm trying to explain how it would work. In theory, it would work similar to the articulation mechanism used on steam locomotives, where the front half of the engine frame follows the track, while the body remains in a straight ahead position.
GG1 FRAME.jpg
GG1 swing detail.jpg
Mr.Ron from South Mississippi

Mr Ron
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Re: Building a model of a GG1

Post by Mr Ron » Wed Nov 14, 2018 10:23 pm

SCBryan wrote:
Mon Nov 12, 2018 12:36 pm
If I remember correctly, Live Steam Magazine had a series on building a GG1 several years ago (10-15?) that had quite a bit of detail. If you could find that series, it might be helpful.
Sorry; I got confused between the GG1 and the DD1. The DD1 is half built and the GG1 is still on the drawing board. I am trying to work out all the little details before I start the build. I also have a B1 switcher under construction.

It may be noted that I design all my projects using Autocad© as if I were going to build the full size engine. All the details are carefully worked out before I start the build. When I was employed, I did detailed designs for ships of the US Navy. Now retired, I work the same way at home. In a way, the actual design is as much a satisfaction to me as the actual build.
Mr.Ron from South Mississippi

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