Machinist's Level help

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John Hasler
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Re: Machinist's Level help

Post by John Hasler » Fri Sep 11, 2020 7:40 am

ctwo wrote:
Thu Sep 10, 2020 9:46 pm
...maybe I will just mill out the center 1/4 of the span.
I agree with Harold. Don't do that. Don't even drill it.

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Bill Shields
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Re: Machinist's Level help

Post by Bill Shields » Fri Sep 11, 2020 2:03 pm

safest thing to do it stick some adhesive rubber feet on the bottom... :shock:
Too many things going on to bother listing them.

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ctwo
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Re: Machinist's Level help

Post by ctwo » Sun Sep 13, 2020 7:44 pm

I don't understand. It is a chord that I cut from a brake rotor, and I've milled half an inch into the top fins and around 100 thou into the bottom already. I feel as though I need to place it into a 500F oven for half a day and let it cool, and then lap it again on my surface plate. Milling it for four long feet instead of two rails would seem to be an easier thing to dial in.

I would not be surprised if it cracked in the oven though...
Standards are so important that everyone must have their own...
To measure is to know - Lord Kelvin
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Harold_V
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Re: Machinist's Level help

Post by Harold_V » Mon Sep 14, 2020 1:32 am

It is highly unlikely that the piece is free of stresses, in spite of the work you've done. If you wish to stabilize the stresses, the 500F you spoke of won't do it. What will do it is 550°C---650°C (1022°F ----1202°F).

Your fear of cracking is likely unfounded. So long as you don't thermal shock or heat cast iron unevenly, it normally doesn't crack from heating. Simply start with ambient temperature, soak for 1½ hours per inch of cross section (once temperature has been achieved), then, if you hope to not introduce any new stresses (from rapid or uneven cooling) simply allow the part to cool in the furnace.

H
Wise people talk because they have something to say. Fools talk because they have to say something.

John Hasler
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Re: Machinist's Level help

Post by John Hasler » Mon Sep 14, 2020 7:56 am

ctwo wrote:
Sun Sep 13, 2020 7:44 pm
I don't understand. It is a chord that I cut from a brake rotor, and I've milled half an inch into the top fins and around 100 thou into the bottom already. I feel as though I need to place it into a 500F oven for half a day and let it cool, and then lap it again on my surface plate. Milling it for four long feet instead of two rails would seem to be an easier thing to dial in.

I didn't realize you were talking a level you made rather than one you purchased. I'd go ahead and mill a bit off the center to make feet and then re-lap.

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ctwo
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Re: Machinist's Level help

Post by ctwo » Tue Sep 15, 2020 11:32 pm

Bill Shields wrote:
Fri Sep 04, 2020 7:31 am
sure it will...if the plate is truly level...then the level will show 'level' in both directions....

first $50 + shipping from 19734 takes it.

98 level.jpg

been in the box for 40 years....and I have 3!

which is a good thing since my 4th got broken in shipping 35 years ago.
It came a day early and I'm very pleased. Thanks Bill!
Standards are so important that everyone must have their own...
To measure is to know - Lord Kelvin
Disclaimer: I'm just a guy with a few machines...

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Bill Shields
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Re: Machinist's Level help

Post by Bill Shields » Wed Sep 16, 2020 7:23 am

very good...put it to good use.

remember...bubble side up
Too many things going on to bother listing them.

Harold_V
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Re: Machinist's Level help

Post by Harold_V » Wed Sep 16, 2020 3:30 pm

Bill Shields wrote:
Wed Sep 16, 2020 7:23 am
remember...bubble side up
Hmmm!
I wonder :idea:
Could that be part of the trouble I've had with levels? :P

H
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Bill Shields
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Re: Machinist's Level help

Post by Bill Shields » Wed Sep 16, 2020 9:08 pm

It has a lot of miles on it..

Started in Mass...shipped to middle east (Saudi Arabia)...back
to Delaware then to California over 40 year time period.

And never been used
Too many things going on to bother listing them.

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ctwo
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Re: Machinist's Level help

Post by ctwo » Fri Sep 18, 2020 8:16 am

It is a world class level :)

I had not realized that there is a small vertical bubble in the center. I was reading about the cross bubble, but have not seen a use case for the vertical bubble (should say vial). I suppose I could put it on my mill or drill press quill.
Standards are so important that everyone must have their own...
To measure is to know - Lord Kelvin
Disclaimer: I'm just a guy with a few machines...

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seal killer
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Re: Machinist's Level help

Post by seal killer » Sun Sep 20, 2020 11:07 am

All--

I got it! Thank you for all the help.

The secret was to find a stable surface on which to set my granite surface plate. I used one of the free-floating shelves I built in the new shop. Although the shelf is strong, I avoided touching it; the only thing I touched was the adjustment mechanism on the level and I used a dental pick to adjust that. Since the shop floor is concrete, there weren't any issues there.

I think a level with a better, much finer thread and easier to use adjustment mechanism would be a vast improvement. From looking at the pictures, it appears that Mitutoyo and Accusize use the same form factor as Grizzly. I'll bet their implementations are not as difficult to adjust, though.

--Bill
You are what you write.

pete
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Re: Machinist's Level help

Post by pete » Sun Sep 20, 2020 1:48 pm

Fwiw my Mit uses a shcs Bill and I've never noticed much issue the few times it's needed adjusting.

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