Fitting and bonding corrugated metal roofing sheets

Sheet Metal Fabrication techniques, questions and help. "Tricks of the Trade"

Moderators: GlennW, Harold_V

User avatar
Harold_V
Posts: 20201
Joined: Fri Dec 20, 2002 11:02 pm
Location: Onalaska, WA USA

Re: Fitting and bonding corrugated metal roofing sheets

Post by Harold_V »

Bill Shields wrote: Sun Jun 20, 2021 3:51 pm I have one of those little torches and they are great for small parts.. like jewelry

The problem is going to be heat conduction away from the intended joint with a large piece of metal
Yep! And that's why I suggested that the small torch may work. Unlike a large flame, it will introduce limited BTU's, so the local area will be hot enough to solder, but not enough to spread far. Don't know that it would work that way, but certainly worth a try.

H
Wise people talk because they have something to say. Fools talk because they have to say something.
wernerml
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon Jun 21, 2021 9:05 am

Re: Fitting and bonding corrugated metal roofing sheets

Post by wernerml »

My grandfather built a roof for his 30" dia lawn decor silo using about 50 long, triangular strips of galvanized. (He was a plumber and had access to a sheet metal shop) He used a copper bar soldering iron in a holder using a ~1" diameter propane torch to heat it. He had a 20# propane bottle and a 10' hose on his torch. I know he was just using regular plumbing solder and acid flux. (at that time it was lead based solder) Using a torch directly on the joint tends to ruin the cleanliness of your prepared joint and burns away the acid flux. Torches work on copper pipes because the joint is protected between the fitting and the pipe.

Main thing with soldering is having a CLEAN lap joint. Very difficult to make a T joint. With your corrugated you may need to have a series of tabs on your end cap that will provide your mechanical strength, then seal the small gaps with solder. Cutting your end caps to match the profile of your curved corrugated will probably be your largest task. :-)

Last I saw that silo cap , ~5 years ago, it was still going strong after 45 plus years.
User avatar
ctwo
Posts: 2996
Joined: Tue Mar 27, 2012 12:37 pm
Location: Silly Cone Valley

Re: Fitting and bonding corrugated metal roofing sheets

Post by ctwo »

I do have a rather large, old-school pencil soldering iron. I'd have to measure but the tip may even be larger than 1/2" round, and then give it a try. Or I may heat from the other side from where I'm soldering. My propane torch is a small 1/4" end.

The good news is that this is all already outside stuff with the usual flashing to protect the fascias, so if it leaks it will just drip where it is already getting wet.
Standards are so important that everyone must have their own...
To measure is to know - Lord Kelvin
Disclaimer: I'm just a guy with a few machines...
johnwinston
Posts: 1
Joined: Sun Jan 28, 2024 6:28 am

Re: Fitting and bonding corrugated metal roofing sheets

Post by johnwinston »

Your project sounds interesting, and it's great that you've put thought into the design. Creating end caps for your corrugated metal half-pipe gutter can be achieved with soldering, as you've considered.

For a strong mechanical bond, here are a few steps you can follow:

Clean the Surfaces: Make sure the surfaces you're going to solder are clean and free of any rust, debris, or oils. Use a wire brush or sandpaper to prepare the metal.

Flux Application: Apply flux to the areas where you plan to solder. Flux helps in the soldering process by promoting the flow of the solder.

Cutting for a Good Fit: Ensure that the edges you plan to solder together have clean, precise cuts. A snug fit will enhance the strength of the bond. Use tin snips or a metal-cutting saw for accurate cuts along the corrugated pattern.

Soldering: Once everything is prepared, use a soldering iron or torch along with lead-free solder for a secure, durable bond. Ensure that the solder flows evenly along the joint.

Testing: After soldering, test the integrity of the joint by applying some force or stress. This will give you confidence in the strength of your end caps.

If you plan to incorporate a downspout, consider soldering a metal sleeve onto the end cap. This will provide a secure attachment point for the downspout.

Before proceeding, I recommend consulting with a local metal working expert or a Metal Roofing Company[/url] to get specific advice based on your materials and design. They may offer additional tips to ensure a successful and durable outcome.
Last edited by Harold_V on Tue Jan 30, 2024 4:12 am, edited 2 times in total.
Reason: to remove link (spam)
User avatar
rmac
Posts: 782
Joined: Tue Jun 26, 2012 12:48 am
Location: Phoenix, Arizona

Re: Fitting and bonding corrugated metal roofing sheets

Post by rmac »

Why would anyone join the forum to post an AI-generated response to a 2-1/2 year-old thread?
User avatar
NP317
Posts: 4530
Joined: Tue Jun 24, 2014 2:57 pm
Location: Northern Oregon, USA

Re: Fitting and bonding corrugated metal roofing sheets

Post by NP317 »

rmac: Education please:

How did you determine the response was AI generated?
I'm trying to learn to recognize such compositions.
Thanks.
RussN
User avatar
rmac
Posts: 782
Joined: Tue Jun 26, 2012 12:48 am
Location: Phoenix, Arizona

Re: Fitting and bonding corrugated metal roofing sheets

Post by rmac »

Russ,

I've played around with ChatGPT enough to just sort of recognize what its responses sound like. So although I'm not 100% sure that the above post was AI-generated, I'm about 99% sure. To show you what I mean, following are a couple of ChatGPT's responses when I asked it to answer ctwo's original post in this thread. These are two different ChatGPT responses to the exact same input. See how johnwinton's post just "sounds like" the AI-generated blurbs? Unfortunately, as AI gets better and better, it will become more and more difficult to separate what's real from what's not.

-- Russ
ChatGPT wrote: Hey there! Your project sounds like a creative and practical solution to utilize the space between your house and garage. The idea of creating a half-pipe "gutter" using corrugated, galvanized metal roofing sheet is interesting.

When it comes to making and bonding end-caps, soldering with the same corrugated sheet is a good approach. To achieve a strong mechanical bond, consider using a flux and solder combination designed for galvanized metal. Make sure to clean the surfaces thoroughly before soldering to remove any oils or contaminants. Using a wire brush or sandpaper can help in preparing the surfaces for bonding.

For cutting the corrugated sheet for a good fit, a pair of tin snips or aviation snips would be handy. Take your time to measure and mark the sheet accurately before cutting. You might also want to create a cardboard or paper template first to ensure precision.

As for the downspout on the other end, integrating it is a great idea for efficient water drainage. You can use a separate piece of corrugated sheet for the downspout, and then solder or attach it securely to your gutter system.

Remember to take safety precautions while working with tools and materials. It sounds like you've put a lot of thought into the design, and with careful execution, your DIY gutter project should be a success. Good luck, and feel free to share updates on your progress!
ChatGPT wrote: Hey! Your project sounds both ambitious and innovative. Creating a half-pipe gutter to utilize the space between your house and garage is a clever idea, and the use of corrugated, galvanized metal roofing sheets adds a practical touch.

When it comes to making and bonding end-caps, soldering with the same corrugated sheet is a solid plan. For a robust mechanical bond, ensure you're using the appropriate flux and solder for galvanized metal. Cleaning the surfaces thoroughly before soldering is crucial to ensure a strong connection?consider using a wire brush or sandpaper for this.

Precision is key when cutting the corrugated sheet for a good fit, and it's great that you're considering making templates. Tin snips or aviation snips should serve you well, but taking your time to measure accurately will guarantee a smoother installation.

The idea of incorporating a downspout for efficient water drainage is smart. Creating a separate piece for the downspout and securely attaching it to your gutter system is a good approach.

Your attention to detail, such as fashioning bulkheads between the fascia boards for additional support and tucking the edges under existing drip flashing, showcases a thoughtful and well-planned project.

Keep up the excellent work, and don't hesitate to ask for further advice or share updates on your progress. Looking forward to hearing more about your successful half-pipe gutter project! ??
User avatar
NP317
Posts: 4530
Joined: Tue Jun 24, 2014 2:57 pm
Location: Northern Oregon, USA

Re: Fitting and bonding corrugated metal roofing sheets

Post by NP317 »

Russ:
Remarkable! Many Thanks for the lesson.
Here we go...
RussN (the other Russ)
User avatar
rmac
Posts: 782
Joined: Tue Jun 26, 2012 12:48 am
Location: Phoenix, Arizona

Re: Fitting and bonding corrugated metal roofing sheets

Post by rmac »

You're welcome.

Besides the general tone of the writing, johnwinston's post contains a few specific things that are just kind of "off":
  • While ctwo's original post is asking mostly about how to cut and mechanically join the parts before soldering, the response is more of a tutorial on "how to solder".
  • In the response's list of steps, it's odd that "Cutting for a Good Fit" comes between "Flux Application" and "Soldering".
  • Random capitalization of "Metal Roofing Company" in the last sentence.
  • The spelling, grammar, and punctuation are perfect. We humans often fall short here when writing casually.
  • Etc.
Post Reply