Left handed lathe, for lack of a better name

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liveaboard
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Re: Left handed lathe, for lack of a better name

Post by liveaboard »

Bill Shields wrote: Wed Feb 07, 2024 9:34 pm In the world is "Swiss" lathes with sliding headstocks, there is a 50-50 split of main spindle on the right vs main spindle on the left.

Generally there is a rule of thumb

If the machine is made in Europe, the main spindle is on the left.

If the machine is made in Asia, then the main spindle is on the right.
I don't know about all of Asia (which describes many countries), but in India where I lived for a long time, the lathes I saw (which were
quite a few) all had the headstock at the left hand of the operator.
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Bill Shields
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Re: Left handed lathe, for lack of a better name

Post by Bill Shields »

it depends on where the lathes were BUILT and if they are of the 'Swiss' type (sliding headstock).

there are very few fixed headstock lathes out there where the main chuck is on the right of the operator.
Too many things going on to bother listing them.
arborist
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Re: Left handed lathe, for lack of a better name

Post by arborist »

Just for sport, look near the bottom of this page:

https://www.thecollector.com/josip-broz ... sm-stalin/

I believe the people who host the site have been informed of the issue and have chosen not to correct it.

RH headstock setups are a little more common in the woodturning world, usually for large bowls, to overcome centre height restrictions. The chucks and faceplates are normally left hand thread.

The other place where a right hand headstock is seen is in horizontal boring machines.
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Bill Shields
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Re: Left handed lathe, for lack of a better name

Post by Bill Shields »

I guess the clue is that on the casting the text is mirrored...giggle....couldn't read the watch...
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Steggy
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Re: Left handed lathe, for lack of a better name

Post by Steggy »

arborist wrote: Thu Feb 08, 2024 11:31 am Just for sport, look near the bottom of this page:

https://www.thecollector.com/josip-broz ... sm-stalin/ ...

I read through the entire piece...this bit caught my eye:

Content removed by Harold_V due to violation of board rules. No political comments are allowed on this board.

Funny how history is repeating itself right now in the good, old USA...

Aside from that, it is patent the photo of the lathe is flipped.
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Music isn’t at all difficult.  All you gotta do is play the right notes at the right time!  :D
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Charles T. McCullough
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Re: Left handed lathe, for lack of a better name

Post by Charles T. McCullough »

For those that enjoy a good read:

"The Left-Hander's Handbook" by James T. de Kay
© 1966
ISBN 1-56731-229-2
Library of Congress Catalog Card Number 97-72759
408 pages

More silly drawings than words, but lists dozens and dozens of famous Left-Handers, and a fun read about being left-handed.
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Re: Left handed lathe, for lack of a better name

Post by liveaboard »

Bill Shields wrote: Thu Feb 08, 2024 8:41 am it depends on where the lathes were BUILT
At that time, the lathes in India were all built in India;
Import of used machines was not allowed, and new machines had 300% import duty, so that didn't happen often either.
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Bill Shields
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Re: Left handed lathe, for lack of a better name

Post by Bill Shields »

Ah, Kirloskar -> one of my truly 'favorite' machine tool builders..a company that (at one time), learned how to truly ruin a Bullard vertical lathe design.

what you are saying is undoubtedly true -> but I was referring to 'Swiss Turn' types of lathes, not manual, hand cranked iron.

sorry, I was not clear on that point.
Too many things going on to bother listing them.
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Re: Left handed lathe, for lack of a better name

Post by liveaboard »

We expats in India used to say; "Standards are low".

My machinist friend was rare, in that he knew what he was doing and took real pride in his work. Many machinists (and other professions there) are just fake; they set themselves up with the gear and make a mess of things because they don't have any training for the job.

Part of the problem is the customers, who all gravitate to the cheapest offer on all things at all times.

My OH busted a fake veterinarian; he was giving saline shots to a dying dog and taking money from the owner. They were to cheap to take their dog to a reputable vet, they didn't want to pay for the transport.
The fake guy made house calls.

Anyway, my pal Babalo told me he wanted to buy a second lathe for his shop; so he packed up some measuring tools and traveled to Bombay for a few days, where he wallowed in the decadent wonders of the big city, the machine market area.

When he got back, he told me that he'd checked 6 machines before finding one that was true. He wrote down the serial number and bought it, but had to wait for delivery of course.

So where did the other 5 machines go?
Into the shops of those fake guys I'm sure. They'll never even notice.
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Bill Shields
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Re: Left handed lathe, for lack of a better name

Post by Bill Shields »

you are talking to a guy that lived in the Middle East for 10 years.

Outside of our company shop, the word 'standard' did not translate into the local language.

as we used to say 'lower than whale poop'....
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Andy R
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The word 'standard' translated

Post by Andy R »

For the majority of my working career I was active on quite a few National Standards committees.

"Standard" does not really represent something as being good or even appropriate for the application.
"Standard" is the lowest level of quality that the lowest quality participating organizations will agree to.
"Standard" thus is the floor below which nothing should be accepted.

Your results may vary.
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Re: The word 'standard' translated

Post by Rich_Carlstedt »

Andy R wrote: Fri Feb 09, 2024 3:34 pm For the majority of my working career I was active on quite a few National Standards committees.

"Standard" does not really represent something as being good or even appropriate for the application.
"Standard" is the lowest level of quality that the lowest quality participating organizations will agree to.
"Standard" thus is the floor below which nothing should be accepted.
Your results may vary.
As an Adjective you are perfectly correct
but as a Noun , it has a meaning applied to machines
" a structure built for or serving as a base or support"
Steam engines would be lost without them
Rich
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