building the galloping goose #2

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dryan3165
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building the galloping goose #2

Post by dryan3165 » Wed Feb 25, 2015 1:15 pm

I am looking into building the Galloping goose #2 using Plum Cove motors and controls with deep cycle batteries since it has a bigger body. Im desiging in solidworks the frame and body but was wondering if anyone has already done this who could lead me in the right direction. I'm a machinist by trade for over 20 years so Im current with the machining terms used in industry. Any help I would greatly appreciate.

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makinsmoke
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Re: building the galloping goose #2

Post by makinsmoke » Wed Feb 25, 2015 8:38 pm

Mark Seibert built one as did Rich Ulin. I believe Mark's was gasoline/mechanical and Rich's was electric as he had a sound system installed.

The trucks are fairly simple arch bar affairs. The rear or drive truck has the axles extended through the wheels to allow sprockets to be attached. The front axle is driven by the engine or motor and the rear by chains and sprockets. Powering the front axle with the Plum Cove affair should be an easy deal.

Both Geese above were built in 2-1/2" scale. One rode inside Mark's goose while Rich's had a roof you rode on.

There are plenty of details of the prototype available. I have built a three truck goose and have some experience and learning curves I can provide.

Take care,
Brian

dryan3165
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Re: building the galloping goose #2

Post by dryan3165 » Thu Feb 26, 2015 9:37 am

Thanks Brian for the info and anyting else you think of would be great. Do you have pictures of the three truck goose? I was thinking of make the #7 goose but wanted to start smaller with the #2.

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ironhorseriley
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Re: building the galloping goose #2

Post by ironhorseriley » Thu Feb 26, 2015 1:35 pm

In Mallory Hope Ferrell's book, "Silver San Juan", he published an excellent 1/4" scale drawing suitable for #3, 4, & 5. I believe in the 1960's "Railroad Model Craftsman" published a small drawing of Goose #7.Of course good pictures and the real machines, #2 & #7 can be seen at the Colorado Railroad Museum in Golden CO. I attempted some patterns for the wheels, but I have not been able to perfect them yet.

Good luck,

Jim
Jim, Former railroader, fascinated by wood working & “all things engineered”.

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Goose
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Re: building the galloping goose #2

Post by Goose » Fri Feb 27, 2015 9:24 am

Regarding the drawing in the Silver San Juan, this is only an generic drawing, since none of the Geese are the same. They have the same apperance, but different length and the other dimensions are also not the same.

Remember, that they where build from scrap-material and the shopcrew used, what material was available and at hand.
As the Galloping Goose Historical Society restored #5 they found three different types of seats in the freight-section.

And beside #2, #6 and #7 at the CRRM, their is #3 at Knott's Berry Farm in Anaheim and #4 in Ridgway.
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chooch
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Re: building the galloping goose #2

Post by chooch » Fri Feb 27, 2015 10:58 pm

Maybe you could check this article from Discoverlivesteam.com. There are several ways to get--er, build a Goose .

http://discoverlivesteam.com/books/Goose.html

chooch
dryan3165 wrote:I am looking into building the Galloping goose #2 using Plum Cove motors and controls with deep cycle batteries since it has a bigger body. Im desiging in solidworks the frame and body but was wondering if anyone has already done this who could lead me in the right direction. I'm a machinist by trade for over 20 years so Im current with the machining terms used in industry. Any help I would greatly appreciate.

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makinsmoke
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Re: building the galloping goose #2

Post by makinsmoke » Sat Feb 28, 2015 2:13 pm

The experience building #2 will be very valuable if you decide to bite the bullet later on and build one of the three truck geese.

3, 4, and 5 were all the same length as were their boxcar bodies, even though number 5 used a different model Pierce Arrow. Number 7 was longer. The boxcar body was 2 feet longer and the front section a little longer, for just under three feet difference between it and 3, 4, and 5.

The front truck as well as the power trucks under all of these units were nearly identical. That is what I mean by experience building #2. In fact, somewhere down the road, you might decide to cannibalize the two trucks from your #2 for a three truck goose, and only have to build the third or trailing truck. Essentially the same as the drive truck, except uses straight axles with no right angle gear drive or rear end, and no need for sprockets and chains.

I used 1" steel channel for both the vehicle frame as well as the boxcar body. The body was a simple affair, with 3/4" plywood sheet for a floor, and aluminum angles mounting the sides and ends to the floor, and the corners. What wasn't screwed together was riveted.

I found that even though a motorman can ride in the boxcar body to operate the goose, and a second person can also fit depending on size, most of the weight with two people is aft of the power truck centerline causing a severe imbalance. This causes the front end to lift, as well as traction issues. I used solid bearings with steel axles and cast iron bearing boxes lubricated with grease zerts. I eventually burned out the cast iron when it got hot climbing a hill with two people in the goose. I would suggest designing the axle bearings with ball or needle bearings on the axles.
This won't necessarily enable you carrying a second person but will make for a better designed and more efficient vehicle.

My drive system was essentially the design used in the Lil' Gasser. a 4 HP Kohler gasoline engine connected to an Eaton hydrostatic transmission with a shaft and flex couplings. A chain sprocket was on this shaft. The chain dropped down though the floor to another shaft mounted with pillow blocks, and drove the front axle of the middle truck with a right angle gear drive. The rear axle was driven by chains and sprockets and a 40 pitch chain per the prototype.
I built the body with aluminum as well. The cab had to be larger than scale to accommodate the drive train, so made it look a little funny. Using the system you are planning should enable you to make the cab more to scale.

Two of the hardest things to make were the cowl area in front of the windshield as well as the radiator. I never got the radiator right. Mark Seibert used a portion of an automobile heater core for his.

The other major issue I had was I wanted the early Pierce Arrow look with the bug-eyed fenders and headlights. I actually had them made up with aluminum sheet and fiberglass, but was never satisfied with the outcome. That and the weight of the fiberglass was very surprising to me once applied, and cause the fenders to sag outwards. They were also very prone to damage.

All of the geese had the bug-eye fenders removed by the early 40's, so if you build your goose with flat fenders it will be easier as well as just fine prototypically.

Here are some links for reference. A photo of Richard Ulin's #2 is the last one:
http://shop.coloradorailroadmuseum.org/ ... id=1000268

http://rgsrr.home.comcast.net/~rgsrr/rg ... tline.html

http://gallopinggoose5.com/pages/news.html

http://www.ridgwayrailroadmuseum.org/Goose4.html

http://avira.search.ask.com/search?&loc ... etail=true

Take care,
Brian

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makinsmoke
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Re: building the galloping goose #2

Post by makinsmoke » Sat Feb 28, 2015 2:14 pm


dryan3165
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Re: building the galloping goose #2

Post by dryan3165 » Tue Mar 03, 2015 2:18 pm

Thanks again Brain I just ordered the drawing of the Goose #2 from the link you provided. I can't wait to get started!!!

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The Train Guy
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Re: building the galloping goose #2

Post by The Train Guy » Thu May 21, 2015 2:18 am

This is my version of Goose #2 that I built over the 2014/15 winter.
This is my first biuld of any kind bigger than HO scale. I used (2) 500 watt electric scooter motors to a locomotive style rear truck that I made. I wanted to use this more like a locomotive so I did not build a seat or foot pegs on it.

I was going to use plum cove stuff but found that he is hard to get a hold of unless he thinks you are going to send him a check for 2K. I wanted to deal with someone that would be around for any tech questions/support on their parts. I am using ride trains control sys with goose sounds. Roy is very easy to work with and will give you all the help you need. I have had no problems with his system so far with over 25 miles on it, and it has pulled 11 cars and me ( 6'-3" 300#) for 10 miles.
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GooseOrBust
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Re: building the galloping goose #2

Post by GooseOrBust » Thu May 21, 2015 7:32 am

Nice pictures, I can't wait to finish mine!

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Harlock
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Re: building the galloping goose #2

Post by Harlock » Thu May 21, 2015 11:53 am

Jack Sessums built a Goose #6, I have some footage of it at the end of my Flintridge & Portola Valley video. Dunno if it's useful for inspiration or not.

https://youtu.be/UeS3DPr1Nsw?t=21m47s

(not embedding directly so that I can use the start-time modifier in the URL to skip to the right place in the video)
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