Looking for suggestions for a respirator

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Glenn Brooks
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Re: Looking for suggestions for a respirator

Post by Glenn Brooks » Thu May 25, 2017 5:49 pm

Maybe next week I will go down to the local welding supply shop and ask about respirators and hoods etc. still having odd side effects when I try to do get up and do to much around the house. I've briefly talked with the welding guys in the shop before, and the words "respirator" and "pretty expensive" were always the main take always. Can't remember seeing anything on display that caught my attention. John, I'll send you a PM so you have my email. I guess Iam curious what your friends would be asking for his speedglass.

I kind of like the idea of supplied air- forced air blowing through the helmet to cause positive pressure inside the hood. Although never tried such a thing. Again, haven't been able to wear any kind of mask- due to glasses fogging over repeatedly.


Glenn
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EOsteam
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Re: Looking for suggestions for a respirator

Post by EOsteam » Fri May 26, 2017 7:31 am

It's not uncommon for aircraft home builders to develop sensitivities to the resins used in composite construction. Here is a link to a unit that is available that uses pumped in air. It's not inexpensive but what price do you put on your health?

http://www.aircraftspruce.com/pages/to/ ... bbyair.php

HJ

Diogenes on the hill
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Re: Looking for suggestions for a respirator

Post by Diogenes on the hill » Thu Apr 19, 2018 7:40 pm

I've been using a simple 3M respirator for a few years now. The filters are thin enough to fit under most hoods (not that wierd looking swedish made one though) and you have two options for filters 95 or 100. Opt for the 100. (Its the pink one, but dont be a putz about fashion, it'll save your life and lungs.) Under most conditions, the filters work well for about 20 hours or so, subject to ventilation and proximity of course.
I weld on galvanized tubing frequently so a respirator is essential, even with proper ventilation. Had zinc poisoning once; wont EVER let that happen again.
Stupid questions remain silent. So speak up.

mikeehlert
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Re: Looking for suggestions for a respirator

Post by mikeehlert » Fri Apr 20, 2018 9:22 am

So glad you are recovering. Most any decent N95 particulate filter will take out most of the metal fume (condensed micro droplets of metal) and smoke / ash https://www.amazon.com/3M-8210PPB1-Part ... or+filters, maybe even the HF ones. They will do nothing for solvents, you'll need activated charcoal for that.
The real problem when welding is the gases (ozone, decomposition products from surface coatings, paint and etc), they go right thru the paper filters. Some of the carbon filters MIGHT reduce them but I would not bet my life and health on them. If you can't position a fan to glow the smoke away then the supplied air respirators discussed above are the way to go. Used for welding inside tanks, other structures, and pipelines so they do work. Be sure you are getting air from a clean source.
Yes they are a lot of money but what is your life and health worth?

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steamin10
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Re: Looking for suggestions for a respirator

Post by steamin10 » Sun Apr 22, 2018 7:06 pm

When I worked for Blaw Knox foundry, the subject of air quality was given a lot of time and expense. Welders wore a dust mask, to filter particulates from smoke, and craneman and floor workers got to wear MSA (mine safty appliance) charcoal masks for the chemical decomposition products around the pouring pits. Various binders and paint like coatings would pyrolize and give off smoky combustion products that had poisonous fumes. Chemical cartridges were available at the welding store, and could be tailored for welding, or paints, or acid fume as needed. Depending on exposure, they would last 2-3 days. I used a lot of them when I painted catalyzed paints with its gassing out of cyanide. It takes very little exposure to make you rip-roaring ill. Of course all the welders were heavy smokers, and I was not on board with that. Several areas were supplied air, where metal dust and sand were processed, you basically did not go into that zone without supplied air. The air was filterd plant air with a very fancy charcoal filter system . It was a full hood system and difficult to work in. I hated to work in the foundry, and was assigned to the scrapyard because of my speed, so I got to stay away from all the mask encumbrances mostly. Very dirty and hazardous work.

When painting aircraft grade paints, I got poisoned twice, the chemicals overunning the mask. In the foundry I got gassed once due to lack of oxygen in a heat treat furnace area. It was only my divers training that saved me from going down in a compromised area. I just walked out. i would warn anybody that once damage is done, it is near impossible to undo. A simple fan with a gentle flow will go along way to keeping you healthier. You dont need a lot of fancy equipment unless your exposure is large. That is what you have to be smart about. Welding with your nose in your project is different than welding at arms length. Thats what they make cheater lenses for, bad habits.
Big Dave, former Millwright, Electrician, Environmental conditioning, and back yard Fixxit guy. Now retired, persuing boats, trains, and broken relics.
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BadDog
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Re: Looking for suggestions for a respirator

Post by BadDog » Mon Apr 23, 2018 1:30 am

You want to really get worried about welding byproducts, read up on phosgene gas. That can make for a very bad day, and applies to all welding processes, particularly electric arc. Not even getting it completely dry before welding is safe. I'm no expert, but anecdotally it appears that even tiny amounts trapped in pores too small to see can produce enough phosgene to nearly(?) kill someone. As I recall, the anecdote in question left a guy in the hospital in serious condition even though he claimed the weldment had been cleaned earlier and was long dry.

So, I keep chlorinated brake cleaner for cleaning sealing surfaces (oil pan, valve cover, etc) and for painting prep on just about everything. And I have non-chlorinated brake cleaner for cleaning oily residue off stuff I need to weld. Humorously enough, the non-chlorinated is in a predominately red can, chlorinated in a black can (for the brand I've been using).
Russ
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mikeehlert
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Re: Looking for suggestions for a respirator

Post by mikeehlert » Mon Apr 23, 2018 8:27 am

BadDog wrote:
Mon Apr 23, 2018 1:30 am
You want to really get worried about welding byproducts, read up on phosgene gas. That can make for a very bad day, and applies to all welding processes, particularly electric arc. Not even getting it completely dry before welding is safe.
Thanks for the reminder.... I had forgotten about that deadly surprise.

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