Photos of Great Lakes freighter crossing North Atlantic 1987

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Mark D
Conductor
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Photos of Great Lakes freighter crossing North Atlantic 1987

Postby Mark D » Sun Jan 07, 2007 2:15 pm

Maybe someone has the story behind these photos??? I don't have the story.
A relative forwarded the link to these photos. When you view, remember this is a Great Lakes bulk freighter. What's it doing crossing the Noth Atlantic? That's the stomping grounds of boats like Queen Mary, Olympic, France, Normandy, United States, etc.
Enjoy;

http://pics.boatnerd.com/view_photo.php?set_albumName=album2419&id=storm2
Mark D. - The bottom of the information curve

Mark D
Conductor
Posts: 3181
Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2005 5:01 pm
Location: Sort of between Litchfield and Forest City, MN.

Re: Photos of Great Lakes freighter crossing North Atlantic

Postby Mark D » Wed Jan 10, 2007 8:40 pm

I finally found this short explanation of the storm the boat in the above post is weathering.
The name of the boat was originally Selkirk Settler. Now owned by Canada Steamship Lines. New name, Spruceglen, or something like that.

Here's what's known about the storm photo's;

The storm pictures were taken during a North Atlantic storm in February 1987 while the ship was en route from Europe to a U.S. East Coast port. The pictures were taken by Capt. George Ianiev, who was the ship's Second Mate at the time. The big blue wave was the largest wave the ship encountered during the storm; seeing it hit the ship made the vessel's master question whether they would survive the storm.
Mark D. - The bottom of the information curve

dampfmann
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Location: Cleveland

Re: Photos of Great Lakes freighter crossing North Atlantic

Postby dampfmann » Thu Jan 18, 2007 1:12 pm

Incredible photos! How that first wave didn't capsize the ship is beyond me.

In addition to several train-related sites I also frequent the "Boatnerd" and related sites. I live near Cleveland, Ohio and I am fortunate to see quite a bit of maritime traffic in and out of our port. Right now the steamer "Alpena" is docked downtown for winter storage. She and her sisters are some of my favorites. They still retain their old "steamship" profile. Definitely not the largest of the Great Lakes freighters, but some of the coolest! Real throwbacks.

Incidentally, I am planning to take my family on vacation to Michigan and the U.P. this summer. I want to hit as many tourist railroads and maritime museums and lighthouses as possible. A stop at The Soo is a must, too. It should be fun. I just have to make sure I include some trips to places my wife and oldest daughter will find enjoyable-- Frankenmuth, MI for example. They are good sports when it comes to visiting places that interest me. I just make sure to plan visits to places that interest "the girls" so everyone has fun.

Martin

Mark D
Conductor
Posts: 3181
Joined: Fri Jul 15, 2005 5:01 pm
Location: Sort of between Litchfield and Forest City, MN.

Re: Photos of Great Lakes freighter crossing North Atlantic

Postby Mark D » Thu Jan 18, 2007 11:47 pm

If you do make it to the Soo, there is a lake freighter that has been turned into a museum. I cannot for the life of me come up with the name just now, but many years ago, and under a different name IIRC, this boat figured in one of the most daring rescues at sea, on Lake Superior, ever.
I'm sure the story will be part of the museum features.
---Added---I remembered the name of the vessel at the Soo. It's the Valley Camp. This great revelation came to me at about 3:00 AM.
This boat was used to rescue crew from another freighter that was about to founder in a devastating storm on Superior. The captain of the Camp actually pulled his boat right to the distressed freighter which allowed crew to jump across and be rescued. I haven't read about it for probably twenty years, so I cannot give specifics and cannot dig the books out right now to bone up. But anyone who's interested can certainly find the story.

I've spent far more of my life running various boats on Lake Superior and to a lesser extent the other great lakes than working with vintage railroad equipment.
Those lake boats are more big barges than those ships that come from across the ocean. For those not from around the Great Lakes, the ocean boats are called "saltie's" around here.
However, that boat in the photos, it turns out, was built as a lake boat but also intended for ocean duty during the winter months.
Still, it's apparent that this particular crossing was a little more than the crew bargained for.
Mark D.
Mark D. - The bottom of the information curve


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